India | Wilson Center

India

Beyond Metropolis: The Planning and Governance of Asia's Mega-Urban Regions

Beyond Metropolis studies planning and governance in the regions surrounding the twelve cities in Asia with populations over ten million: Tokyo, Mumbai, Kolkata, Dhaka, Delhi, Shanghai, Jakarta, Osaka, Beijing, Karachi, Metro Manila, and Seoul. These regions are greater than cities plus suburbs: for almost all, development has sprawled into the surrounding countryside, enveloping villages, towns, and small and medium-sized cities, creating “extended metropolitan regions.”

The India-China Relationship: What the United States Needs to Know

As we move further into a new century, the two most populous nations on earth, India and China, continue a long and tangled relationship. Given their contested border, their nuclear rivalry, their competition for influence in Asia, their growing economic relations, and their internal problems, interaction between these two powers will deeply affect not only stability and prosperity in the region, but also vital U.S. interests. Yet the dynamics of the Chinese-Indian relationship are little known to Americans.

Conflict Unending: India-Pakistan Tensions since 1947

The escalating tensions between India and Pakistan have received renewed attention of late. Since their genesis in 1947, the nations of India and Pakistan have been locked in a seemingly endless spiral of hostility over the disputed territory of Kashmir. Ganguly asserts that the two nations remain mired in conflict due to inherent features of their nationalist agendas. Indian nationalist leadership chose to hold on to this Muslim-majority state to prove that minorities could thrive in a plural, secular polity.

India and Pakistan: The First Fifty Years

One fifth of the world’s people live in India and Pakistan. Looking back on their first fifty years of independence, leading specialists on South Asia assess their progress and problems, their foreign and defense policies and their relations with the United States. The three coeditors, who compare the achievements of India and Pakistan in a perceptive introductory overview, combine journalistic, diplomatic and academic experience

In addition to these explorations and comparisons of internal issues, the final chapter reviews U.S. relations with India and Pakistan.

The Crisis in Kashmir: Portents of War, Hopes of Peace

This book traces the origins of the insurgency in Indian-controlled Jammu and Kashmir. The first theoretically-grounded account, and the most complete, it is based on extensive interviews. Ganguly’s central argument is that the insurgency can be explained by political mobilization and institutional decay. In an attempt to woo the Muslims, the government dramatically expanded literacy, mass media, and higher education. Meanwhile, fearing potential secessionist proclivities, it stifled the development of political institutions.

Bridled Ambition: Why Countries Constrain Their Nuclear Capabilities

This study presents an account of why nuclear weapons are rapidly becoming less attractive than they once seemed and what factors can motivate a country's leaders to keep nuclear ambitions in check. Written by an arms control expert, Bridled Ambition explains how nine countries—South Africa, Argentina, Brazil, Ukraine, Belarus, Kazakhstan, India, Pakistan and North Korea—have recently capped, curtailed, or rolled back their nuclear weapons programmes. Among the issues discussed how, when, where and why South Africa built the bomb, how they planned to use it and why they gave it up.

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