Iran

An Assessment of the Iranian Presidential Elections

The Middle East Project at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars arranged a series of meetings on June 25 and 26, 2001, to assess the June 9 presidential elections in Iran. A number of Iranian specialists from Iran and the U.S. took part in the sessions. This publication brings together the papers presented at these meetings. Edited by Haleh Esfandiari and Andrea Bertone.

Foreword, by Haleh Esfandiari

JUNE 25, 2001
Moderator, Shaul Bakhash

Middle Eastern Women on the Move

Introduction
Haleh Esfandiari

Women, Information Technology, and Human Development
Mahnaz Afkhami

Zanan: Trials and Successes of a Feminist Magazine in Iran
Roza Eftekhari

The Art of Female Publishing
Mansoureh Ettehadieh

Is Reformist Politics Good for Iranian Women?
Farideh Farhi

From Program to Practice:Towards Women’s Meaningful and Effective Political Participation in Jordan and Lebanon
Laurie King-Irani

The "Strategic" Partnership Between India and Iran (PDF)

ABSTRACT: India and Iran—one the object of much wooing from Washington, the other a member of President Bush’s “axis of evil” —announced the creation of a “strategic partnership” in 2003. This Special Report explores the new cordiality in relations between New Delhi and Tehran, as well as the ways this partnership may impact upon the interests of other regional players. Christine Fair explains the calculations that make Iran an attractive partner for New Delhi, and concludes that the bilateral relationship is here to stay. Jalil Roshandel offers an Iranian perspective on the relationship.

Syria and Iran: An Alliance Tested?

Jubin Goodarzi, a professor of international relations at Webster University in Geneva, presented his insights on the nature of the Syria-Iran alliance in light of recent changes in the Middle East and within the context of their long-standing relationship.

On May 9, the Middle East Program hosted a meeting on "Syria and Iran: An Alliance Tested?" with Goodarzi. Haleh Esfandiari, Director of the Middle East Program, moderated the event.

NPIHP Partner Dima Adamsky Publishes Response in Foreign Affairs

Writing in Foreign Affairs, NPIHP partner Dima Adamsky explores a variety of possible Israeli responses to the advent of a nuclear armed Iran.

Regime Change: U.S. Strategy through the Prism of 9/11

The 9/11 terrorist attacks starkly recast the U.S. debate on “rogue states.” In this new era of vulnerability, should the United States counter the dangers of weapons proliferation and state-sponsored terrorism by toppling regimes or by promoting change in the threatening behavior of their leaders? Regime Change examines the contrasting precedents set with Iraq and Libya and provides incisive analysis of the pressing crises with North Korea and Iran.

Rogue States and U.S. Foreign Policy: Containment after the Cold War

President Clinton and other U.S. officials have warned that “rogue states” pose a major threat to international peace in the post-Cold War era. But what exactly is a rogue state? Does the concept foster a sound approach to foreign policy, or is it, in the end, no more than a counterproductive political epithet? Robert Litwak traces the origins and development of rogue state policy and then assesses its efficacy through detailed case studies of Iraq, Iran, and North Korea. He shows that the policy is politically selective, inhibits the ability of U.S.

Reconstructed Lives: Women and Iran's Islamic Revolution

The Islamic revolution of 1979 transformed all areas of Iranian life. For women, the consequences were extensive and profound, as the state set out to reverse legal and social rights women had won and to dictate many aspects of women’s lives, including what they could study and how they must dress and relate to men.

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