Japan

U.S. Trade, North Korea Policies Bring Asia’s Biggest Economies to Table

North Korea continues to dominate the headlines as all eyes are now on Kim Jong-un’s upcoming meeting with President Donald Trump. But while Pyongyang’s overtures to the outside world have repercussions for peace far beyond East Asia, there is also another significant development in the region that has not garnered as much media attention as what is happening in the Korean Peninsula, but is at least as significant for the region in the longer term. 

Catch-Up: Read the Latest Research and Commentary from the Asia Program

At the Asia Program, our experts and scholars are always producing new research and analysis on a rapidly changing region.  Our most recent pieces look at North Korea, Japan, China, and Taiwan to explore foreign policy, diplomacy, military strategy, and trade.  All of our reports are available for download on our website.  You can also sign up for our mailing lists to be updated about upcoming events, recent publications, and other news. 

Death of a Bromance?

As Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe prepares to visit Washington later this month, it’s clear that his upcoming meeting with President Trump won’t be an easy one, to say the least. At his previous meetings with the U.S. president, issues of potential conflict were averted to concentrate instead on the positive relationship. This time around, though, conflict will be inevitable since there will be a number of must-gets by Abe in order for the talks to be deemed as a success.

Japan’s Strategic Power in International Relations

The so-called lost two decades of Japan’s economic power since the early 1990s have generated the idea that Japan is no longer a significant player. Instead, policymakers and academics alike now focus far more on the rise of China. In Re-rising Japan: Its Strategic Power in International Relations,  Yoichiro Sato and Hidekazu Sakai challenge this idea head-on with evidence that Japan is actually a major power in today’s international relations where the interests and power of the United States and China have increasingly clashed over many issues.

The Future of Global Trade under CPTPP

On his first day in office, President Donald Trump formally withdrew the United States from the Trans-Pacific Partnership agreement that had been championed by his predecessor.  Just over one year later, the leaders of the eleven countries left behind by this decision gathered in Santiago, Chile to commit to a partnership of their own dubbed the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership (CPTPP) or TPP 11.

Public Diplomacy and the Evolution of US-Japan Relations

Wariness of political correctness and distrust of intellectuals has led to the proliferation of “post-truth” or “fake news”. That has made it more difficult to distinguish between the role of public diplomacy and outright propaganda. How the United States leverages its soft power could define Washington’s relations with key allies worldwide, including Japan. Join us for a discussion on the outlook for public diplomacy between Japan and the United States, and the challenges of political communications amid rapidly changing perspectives on national identity.

U.S. Trade Policy in Northeast Asia

Economic openness and globalization are seen to hurt U.S. jobs and industrial competitiveness, according to the ideas supporting the White House’s “America First” policy.

Ringing in 2018 with the Indo-Pacific in Mind

Can the Indo-Pacific strategy be more than a slogan and actually become a policy goal? That’s certainly a challenge Japan is willing to take on in 2018. While the country officially rings in the new year over the course of three days, that tradition didn’t stop Foreign Minister Taro Kono from curtailing his vacation for a three-day tour of three countries bordering the Indian Ocean to bolster Tokyo’s clout as an Asian leader.

2018: The Year Ahead in Asia

What to Watch in 2018

The coming year is shaping up to be highly consequential for the Asia-Pacific. The distribution of the region’s economic, political, and military power is evolving rapidly, which will have profound implications for regional stability and for American interests. To inaugurate the Wilson Center Asia Program’s new blog Dispatches, the program’s staff has compiled brief analyses of what we believe to be some of the most critical issues to watch in 2018.

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