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Wilson Center Welcomes Japan Scholar Nobuo Fukuda

WASHINGTON--The Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars welcomes Nobuo Fukuda as a Wilson Center Japan Scholar. Fukuda will spend three months in residence at the Wilson Center, beginning in February 2011, working on a research project examining forms of positive nationalism in Asia.

Greater China? Migration and Chinese Transnational Communities

This Special Report examines the history, structure, and dynamics of Chinese transnational communities. Philip A. Kuhn provides an overview of migration from China from the 16th century. Sara L. Friedman examines marriages between Taiwanese and mainland Chinese spouses in the context of Taiwanese immigration regulations and national identity. Vanessa L. Fong presents the results of research on the motivations and expectations of Chinese students who choose to study in developed nations. And Kenneth J.

Прагматизм і плюралізм як рушії розвитку великого міста

Книга відомого американського дослідника-урбаніста, директора Інституту Кеннана Міжнародного центру підтримки науковців ім. Вудро Вілсона Second Metropolis: Pragmatic Pluralism in Gilded Age Chicago, Silver Age Moscow, and Meiji Osaka є аналітичним дослідженням процесів піднесення трьох визначних світових міст Чикаго, Москви і Осаки на зламі ХІХ—ХХ ст., міст, що тривалий час відігравали роль других столиць у своїх державах. Історія їх становлення є не лише цікавим фактом міської історії США, Росії та Японії, а в певному сенсі надбанням всього людства.

The Japan-U.S. Partnership Toward a World Free of Nuclear Weapons

This summary of the Japan-U.S. Joint Public Policy Forum, held in Tokyo in October 2009, discusses the U.S.-Japan bilateral alliance and issues relating to non-proliferation and moving toward a world free of nuclear weapons. The Forum was co-sponsored by the Wilson Center’s Asia Program and the Sasakawa Peace Foundation. This report includes transcripts of keynote speeches by Japan’s former Permanent Representative to the United Nations Yukio Satoh and the former U.S. Secretary of Defense William J. Perry.

Chinese Utopianism: A Comparative Study of Reformist Thought with Japan and Russia, 1898-1997

Chinese Utopianism offers a new explanation of extreme radicalism in Chinese reform movements from the late nineteenth century through the Cultural Revolution and into the post-Mao era. By studying comparable Japanese and Russian reforms that have, in contrast, pulled their societies back toward the center, Shiping Hua demonstrates how datong—an ancient concept that can be translated as “great harmony”—and other elements of Chinese thought have led China down a unique political path.

Asian Diplomacy: The Foreign Ministries of China, India, Japan, Singapore, and Thailand

Based on over 160 interviews, Asian Diplomacy evaluates the ministries of foreign affairs in five major Asian countries. For each country, Kishan S. Rana first sketches the historical and political background of its diplomatic service. He reviews the structural features of the service; its responsibilities in such key areas as economic and political relations; and its methods for intragovernmental relations, decision making, and crisis management. He then provides a summary assessment of each service and concludes by asking what is special about Asian diplomacy.

Local Consequences of the Global Cold War

Up to now the study of cold war history has been fully engaged in stressing the international character and broad themes of the story. This volume turns such diplomatic history upside down by studying how actions of international relations affected local popular life.

Soft Power and Its Perils: U.S. Cultural Policy in Early Postwar Japan and Permanent Dependency

This book examines the cultural aspects of U.S.-Japan relations during the postwar Occupation and the early years of the Cold War and analyzes their effect on the adoption of democratic values by the Japanese. Takeshi Matsuda finds that the results were mixed: Japan is an electoral democracy but intellectually remains elitist and submissive—in part because of U.S. efforts to reinforce the domestic importance of intellectual elites. The author is especially concerned with the development of American Studies in Japan, and U.S. efforts to foster it.

Sino-Japanese Relations: Interaction, Logic, and Transformation

With the passing of the “friendship generation” and the increase in (mostly negative) societal participation in the late 1980s, the governments of China and Japan have found it increasingly difficult to navigate between the constraints and possibilities in their relationship. Based on ten years’ research in the United States, China, and Japan, this book argues that the relationship is politically now dispute-prone, cyclical, and downward-trending but manageable; militarily uncertain; economically integrating; psychologically closer in people-to-people contact yet more distant.

Beyond Metropolis: The Planning and Governance of Asia's Mega-Urban Regions

Beyond Metropolis studies planning and governance in the regions surrounding the twelve cities in Asia with populations over ten million: Tokyo, Mumbai, Kolkata, Dhaka, Delhi, Shanghai, Jakarta, Osaka, Beijing, Karachi, Metro Manila, and Seoul. These regions are greater than cities plus suburbs: for almost all, development has sprawled into the surrounding countryside, enveloping villages, towns, and small and medium-sized cities, creating “extended metropolitan regions.”

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