Mexico

Mexico's Migrant Issues Expose Trump's Faulty Border Logic

Record numbers of migrants, over 70 percent of whom are from Guatemala and Honduras, are being processed by immigration officials. Asylum claims are up more than 1,000 percent since 2013.

Shelters along the border are overwhelmed, and the government is scrambling to keep up. This may sound like the introduction to every article you have read about the U.S. southwest border crisis, yet the prior statements refer not to the United States but to Mexico.

Infographic: Mexico's New Labor Reform

Ground Truth Briefing | The Consequences of a U.S.-Mexico Border Shutdown

Over the past week, President Trump has renewed threats to shut down the U.S.-Mexico border. This comes at a time when Mexico is making new efforts to lower the number of people entering the United States through Mexico. In recent months, there has been a dramatic surge in the number of migrants crossing into the United States at or between official ports of entry on the southern border.

Trump Threatens to Put Tariffs on Cars Coming from Mexico

"Imposing tariffs on cars for this reason would be a huge violation of existing trade rules. What’s more it would be immensely costly for US auto producers and consumers. It’s difficult to see this as a credible threat. The Mexican government will surely view this threat with some skepticism as well as frustration after making significant concessions to Trump on migration last week."

- Duncan Wood 

 

Mexico is Learning that if You Give Trump an Inch, He'll Take a Mile

Mexico is rapidly learning that appeasing Donald Trump is, at best, a short-term solution.

Mexican President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador (AMLO) has adopted an attitude of placation and appeasement in his dealings with Trump and has tried to either ignore provocations from the White House or make concessions to avoid an unwanted spat. That strategy has failed.

Get USMCA Done to Preserve Over 30 Years of Prosperity

The United States, Mexico and Canada have forged a massive commercial relationship over the past three decades.

The North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) significantly reorientated all three economies. Businesses and farmers built mutually beneficial co-production networks that enabled them to compete successfully against other global trading powers.

The new U.S.-Mexico-Canada trade agreement (USMCA) preserves economic advances wrought since NAFTA came into effect in 1994.

Strengthening Counter-Narcotics Cooperation with Mexico and Central America: A Conversation with Senator John Cornyn

Transnational criminal organizations and cartels use corridors connecting Central and South America to the United States as an illicit sales route, dealing in anything that can turn a profit. Drug trafficking, human smuggling, illicit weapons, money laundering, and public corruption are the tools of their poisonous trade, and countries throughout the region suffer the devastating effects.

The Contours of Global Security: Border Lines, Critical Regions

As debate rages in Washington over President Trump’s characterization of the situation at the southern U.S. border as a national security emergency, the risks and stakes in several hot-spot regions around the world are far less open to question.

Leading Wilson Center experts surveyed the state of affairs at North America’s borders and in areas experiencing acute security crises, from Venezuela to North Korea to Syria.
 

Selected Quotes 

 

Attack Fentanyl Flows Across Borders: A Real Emergency

As the United States debates “emergencies” at its southern border and negotiates a trade deal with China, U.S. leaders must confront the lethal trade in fentanyl from other North American countries and especially from China, a major player in the opioid epidemic that is killing tens of thousands of Americans each year.  

The U.S. needs to double down on efforts to assure more effective cooperation with China, Mexico and Canada, bilaterally and through a new four-way framework to halt this deadly commerce.

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