Mexico

Mexico’s Renewable Energy Future

As the second-largest economy in Latin America with more than 40 million electricity customers, growing demand for power, and significant potential untapped renewable energy resources, Mexico is well positioned to expand its power generation from renewables. The energy reform has created many incentives to facilitate investment in renewables. However, a number of challenges remain.

Of Paradigm Shifts and Political Conflict: The History of Mexico’s Second Energy Revolution

The story of Mexico’s paradigm shift in energy policy is nothing short of extraordinary. The breadth and depth of the reform, the dramatic break with the past, and the positive long-term impact on Mexico’s economy are of course remarkable, but the story of the political process is also worthy of recognition.

Mexico's New Energy Model: The Evolving Global Energy System

No industry is as essential to the human condition as energy. It fuels our cars, lights our homes, and powers our businesses. The enterprise of creating and maintaining a durable energy system—the collective means by which society generates and distributes vital energy resources—has been around for generations. But longevity is not the same as constancy, and energy analysts have taken on the dual task of defining the status quo of the energy system as well as projecting its potential evolution.

U.S. Auto Proposals Pose Big Challenge for NAFTA Talks

House Speaker Paul Ryan (R-Wis.) said that he needs a proposed North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) deal in the days ahead if Congress is to vote on it this year. The prospects for meeting that timeframe is unclear.

Getting a NAFTA  deal now would boost North America’s economies, but trade ministers and negotiators from Canada, Mexico and the U.S. remain divided on difficult issues. Ministers have left negotiating teams to work in Washington and remain on call. They focused on rules for auto manufacturing last week.  

Vanishing Frontiers: The Forces Driving Mexico and the United States Together

There may be no story today with a wider gap between fact and fiction than the relationship between the United States and Mexico. Deeply intertwined social, economic, cultural, and family relationships make the U.S.-Mexico border more seam than barrier, weaving together two economies, societies, and cultures.

One Month Out: New Perspectives on the 2018 Mexican Election

On July 1, 2018, Mexicans go to the polls to pick a new President and a new Congress. Throughout the campaign, there has been a clear front-runner, Andrés Manuel López Obrador (AMLO), who on his third attempt to win the presidency appears to have cracked the code on how to convince Mexico’s voters that he offers an opportunity for positive change rather than a threat. AMLO’s Morena party may also be heading towards a congressional majority, raising the possibility that he will be able to enact an ambitious legislative agenda.

Mexico's Diaspora Electorate

Elections in Mexico can produce perplexing situations: “se cayó el sistema;” “voto por voto, casilla por casilla.” In the Mexican diaspora, elections create paradoxes of their own.

Assuring Energy Security with a Modern NAFTA

As negotiations reach the go/no go point for a revised North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), President Trump should recognize the agreement’s impact on one of his top priorities: U.S. energy dominance.  While the United States has been strengthening its domestic energy sector, Mexico and Canada have become our two most important energy partners.  Securing and expanding those partnerships benefits the U.S.

A North American Workforce Development Agenda: Better Jobs for a More Competitive Region - Presentation by Ambassador Earl Anthony Wayne

Arizona Needs to Pay Close Attention to NAFTA Negotiations

Trade negotiators from Mexico, Canada and the United States are in overdrive trying to forge an agreement on an updated NAFTA treaty by mid-May. Trade ministers from the three counties began their latest round of meetings on Monday, to bridge gaps on key issues.

Arizona has an enormous amount at stake: 47 percent of its exports go to Mexico and Canada.

That commerce supports 236,000 Arizona jobs and generates more than $10 billion in exports.

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