Middle East and North Africa | Wilson Center

Middle East and North Africa

Towards Long Term Sustainable Solutions to the Syrian Refugee Crisis

UNHCR's new report published this week estimates that by the end of 2018, "almost 70.8 million individuals were forcibly displaced worldwide as a result of persecution, conflict, violence, or human rights violations.” This is another record high number and a stark reminder of the magnitude of the global refugee crisis.

U.S. Leadership Needed on Syrian Refugee Crisis

Sixty percent of Syria’s population are either refugees or internally displaced.  Of those thirteen million Syrians, nearly six million are refugees who fled to neighboring Middle Eastern nations—five times more than the one million in Europe and the U.S.

Strengthening Egypt’s Refugee Programs

Over the past two years the number of registered refugees and asylum seekers in Egypt has increased by 21 percent. Today, Egypt is among the highest destination countries in Africa receiving documented and undocumented immigrants. Many are African, Yemeni, or Syrian refugees fleeing political instability, conflict, and civil war.

Displaced in Yemen: Stories of Hardship and Hope

My name is Warda (Rose in Arabic) and I am a community activist in Yemen. I began my work with many local institutions in Aden in 2011 first as a volunteer and later on as an executive director of the Fikr Foundation for Development. After gaining sufficient experience in the field and driven by a sense of responsibility towards my community particularly its women members, I set up my own organization, Yad Bi Yad (Hand-in-Hand) for Development in 2015.

The Jasmine Journey: Creating Self-sufficiency for Syrian women in Jordan

In 2012, my family and I fled the war in Syria to neighboring Jordan. We did not think we would be there long. However, after over a year in Amman, I was compelled to think creatively to make a living and become financially independent.

Investing in Refugee Women is not Just Right and Decent, But Smart

Imagine you are a female professional in your country; a lawyer, teacher, engineer or a photographer. Out of personal, religious or socio-economic reasons, you have to move to an unknown country because you want to resettle in the safe and liberal world whose ideas you embrace. Imagine another situation in which you are a housewife, with a primary school education, who got married quite young and established a family with several children but low income. Until the outbreak of the civil war, you had been living in a rural area of Syria with your family.

Strengthening Refugee and Host Communities: Livelihoods, Education, and Social Protections

As the Global Compact on Refugees notes, millions of refugees “live in protracted situations, often in low- and middle-income countries facing their own economic and development challenges.” According to UNHCR, almost 12.2 million Syrians in the Middle East either are refugees in neighboring host countries or internally displaced. Eight years into the Syrian conflict, the refugee crisis continues to put economic and political pressures on host communities and international actors.

MENA Women in the Workforce: Understanding Social Norms 

The Middle East and North Africa region continues to have one of the lowest female labor participation rates in the world. Despite progress in some countries with more women receiving tertiary education, challenges and inequities persist.

 

Pages