North America

Where Do We Go from Here? Merida 2.0 and the Future of Mexico-United States Security Cooperation

The inauguration of Andrés Manuel López Obrador on December 1, 2018 as President of Mexico opens a new era in Mexico’s security relationship with the United States. For the past 11 years, the United States and Mexico have anchored that relationship in a policy of shared responsibility where increased collaboration to address common security challenges has been the hallmark.

Three Alternatives to a Wall That Will Strengthen the Southern U.S. Border

This article was originally published on January 12 in The Hill.

The impasse over President Trump’s demand for the $5.7 billion wall funding has resulted in one of the longest government shutdowns in U.S. history, threats to declare a national emergency and over 800,000 federal workers living without pay.

Government or Revolution?

In the historical vision of the Left, the government was not the product of an election but rather as the result of a revolution or, in any case, as a takeover. The objective was power and the means for acquiring it were least in importance: assumption of power to change the world.

Where Do We Go from Here?: Merida 2.0 and the Future of Mexico-U.S. Security Cooperation

The inauguration of Mexican President Andrés Manuel López Obrador on December 1, 2018 opens a new era in the country's security relationship with the United States. For the past 11 years, the United States and Mexico have anchored that relationship in a policy of shared responsibility where increased collaboration to address common security challenges has been the hallmark.

Infographic: What's Happening at the U.S.-Mexico Border?

U.S., Mexico Defy Expectations by Cooperating on Immigration

Mexico and the United States are defying expectations by identifying ways to cooperate on the contentious issues surrounding migration. 

Since Mexico’s new president, Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador (AMLO), took office on Dec. 1, U.S. and Mexican officials have hammered out a dual-track approach to tackling the flow and management of migrants heading northward from Central America to Mexico and the United States.   

One track is a cooperative multi-year strategy designed to help keep potential migrants in their home regions by creating new economic opportunities.

'Narcos: Transnational Cartels and Border Security': Earl Anthony Wayne Testifies before the U.S. Senate Committee on the Judiciary, Subcommittee on Border Security and Immigration

 

Watch the Full Hearing > > 

Download the document below for full version of testimony.

Cooperation between Mexico and the United States regarding transnational crime is vital. Both societies pay a high price for the illegal traffic in drugs, money, guns and people that cross our common border.

Mexico is an Increasingly Viable Destination for Migrants

The migrant caravan dominated much of the lead-up to the U.S. midterm elections. While the U.S. pundits debated the appropriate response to the caravan and many criticized the decision to send troops to the U.S.-Mexico border, Mexico began to consider pragmatic solutions to address these migration flows.

Infographic | USMCA Chapter 20: Intellectual Property

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