North Korea | Wilson Center

North Korea

Assignment: North Korea

Images and insights from inside the DPRK

North Korean leader Kim Jong Un may have transformed his image from Hermit King to diplomatic statesman by stepping out onto the world stage in 2018 and 2019. But in 2020, with few Americans traveling to Pyongyang due to years of tightened sanctions and travel bans, the people of North Korea remain as hidden and muted as ever before.

What to Look for in 2020: The Year Ahead in Asia

Alliances in Crisis

How Korea Transformed the Cold War: Fearing the Worst

In this edition of Wilson Center NOW we speak with author and Wilson Center Cold War Fellow Sam Wells on his latest book Fearing the Worst: How Korea Transformed the Cold War.  After World War II, the escalating tensions of the Cold War shaped the international system.  Wells book explains how the Korean War fundamentally changed postwar competition between the United States and the Soviet Union into a militarized confrontation that would last decades.

Two years on, a sobering look at the human toll of the maximum pressure campaign against North Korea

We are now more than two years into the Trump Administration's "maximum pressure" campaign against North Korea, a sanctions regime designed to compel Pyongyang to give up its nuclear program. This almost total embargo on the country has yet to yield any concrete progress on denuclearization. All it seems to have achieved is hurting ordinary North Koreans.

Fearing the Worst: How Korea Transformed the Cold War

After World War II, the escalating tensions of the Cold War shaped the international system. Fearing the Worst explains how the Korean War fundamentally changed postwar competition between the United States and the Soviet Union into a militarized confrontation that would last decades.

Fearing the Worst: How Korea Transformed the Cold War

After World War II, the escalating tensions of the Cold War shaped the international system. Fearing the Worst: How Korea Transformed the Cold War explains how the Korean War fundamentally changed postwar competition between the United States and the Soviet Union into a militarized confrontation that would last decades.

On the Brink: Trump, Kim, and the Threat of Nuclear War

In 2017, the world watched as President Donald Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un traded personal insults and escalating threats of nuclear war amid unprecedented shows of military force. Former Pentagon insider and Korean security expert Van Jackson traces the origins of the first American nuclear crisis in the post-Cold War era, and explains the fragile, highly unpredictable way that it ended.

Parsing the propaganda: What to make of Kim Jong Un on a white horse

Kim Jong Un on a white horse, galloping through the snowy mountains at top speed, fog and mist rising behind him. Kim Jong Un leading the charge up a steep mountain, like a general leading warriors heading off to battle. Kim Jong Un lost in thought as he rides solemnly through the forests of Mount Paektu, his sister at his side.

Transformation or Transaction: Can the US Solve the Nuclear Crises with Iran and North Korea?

In this edition of Wilson Center NOW we speak with Robert Litwak, author of the new book,Nuclear Crises with North Korea and Iran: From Transformational to Transactional Diplomacy.” Litwak explains how the ongoing nuclear impasses with both North Korea and Iran reflect a continuing tension in U.S.

Book Launch | Nuclear Crises with North Korea and Iran: From Transformational to Transactional Diplomacy

The ongoing nuclear impasses with both North Korea and Iran reflect a persisting tension in U.S. policy: Should diplomacy be transactional, focused narrowly on the discrete nuclear challenge, or transformational, comprehensively addressing these regimes’ objectionable behavior? Rhetorically, with both North Korea and Iran, the Trump administration aspires for the transformational. Breaking the impasses requires a pivot from a transformational strategy to the transactional.

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