Pakistan

After the Pakistan Policy Symposium: Next Steps

On October 17 and 18, the Asia Program, in partnership with INDUS, convened its Pakistan Policy Symposium—an unprecedented two-day conference, held at the Wilson Center, on the challenges and opportunities for Pakistan in the years ahead.

Securing the Third Pole: Glaciers, Snowpacks, and Water Vulnerability in High Asia

Known as the “Third Pole,” the Hindu-Kush-Himalaya, Pamir and Tien Shan mountain ranges of High Asia are home to the snow and ice headwaters of Asia’s most important rivers. These rivers provide drinking water, hydropower, irrigation, and other essential services to billions of people living downstream and changes in the mountains’ glaciers and snow reservoirs have cascading impacts on the region’s economic and human security. Protecting these essential water sources in a complex geopolitical setting requires transboundary science, public policy, and local efforts.

Water @ Wilson: 50 Years of Water, Conflict, and Cooperation

Thank you for your interest in the event. Due to high response, the RSVP link has been deactivated. Please tune-in live on November 28th to watch the event. 

 

Event Recap: The Quetta Experience

In light of the administration adopting a tougher stance with regards to policies of Pakistan that it deems deeply problematic, there has been much debate about what the future holds for the U.S.-Pakistan relationship. However, despite the recent downturn in bilateral relations, the consensus remains that the U.S. can ill-afford to disengage with a nation critical to its interests.

Islamic Law, the Nation State, and the Case of Pakistan

In recent decades, ambivalence toward modernity, along with the promise of justice and morality, have led to efforts in some Muslim-majority countries to partially “Islamize” the state. Pakistan presents an important case study. Pakistan’s Islamization program in the 1970s and 1980s promised increased justice and other public goods by virtue of laws purportedly rooted in revelation. This program has resulted in some controversial outcomes, such as Pakistan’s blasphemy law.

AfPak File Podcast: Pakistan's Economy Under Imran Khan

Pakistan’s new government, which took office in August, has inherited a series of urgent economic challenges. These include plunging foreign reserves, a balance of payments crisis, and water and energy shortages. The new administration, led by cricketer-turned-politician Imran Khan, will need to move quickly.

Can Pakistan Experience an Era of Change?

Pakistan’s new government has promised to shake things up.

Elected in July and led by cricketer-turned-politician Imran Khan and his Pakistan Tehreek-e-Insaf party (PTI), the new administration has vowed to do away with business as usual. The PTI projects itself as something different—a clean party not led by a family dynasty—and insists it will run the country differently from previous government as well.

Event Recap: Fears of the Fourth Estate, Current Challenges for the Pakistani Press

Today, we live in a world of increasing democratic backsliding and attacks on free speech are not uncommon. Pakistan is no different–print or media journalists who are perceived to have crossed certain red-lines can face censorship and intimidation while the media houses that employ them could be financially undercut. As the Pakistani state cracks down on the mainstream media, social media has become a bastion of critical voices, but now the Pakistani authorities have turned their attention to social media and bloggers are facing similar consequences.

AfPak File: What's Next for the Haqqani Network?

Earlier this month, the Taliban announced that Jalaluddin Haqqani, the founder, and leader of the feared Haqqani Network terror group, had died.

The Haqqani Network is a militant outfit fighting against the Afghan state and the U.S.-led forces that support it. It is a particularly potent faction of the Afghan Taliban.

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