Russia

Dealing with the Soviet Past: Is There a Right Memory Model for Russia?

The Soviet past looms large in present-day Russia. Some view history with a mix of pride and nostalgia, while others focus on the crimes of the communist system, in particular state terror. Several projects exist in Russia to reconcile its past, a few of which are inspired by foreign models. Nikolay Epplée and Mischa Gabowitsch will discuss international models of coming to terms with the past that might prove productive for Russia, and the difficulties that can arise when learning commemorative practices from other countries.

25th Anniversary of the Russian Constitution

December 12th marks the 25th anniversary of the adoption of the Russian constitution. Historians still debate the controversial events that accompanied the constitution’s birth, but a generation of Russian lawyers has now grown up knowing only this founding legislation as Russia’s highest law. Thus, what was originally perceived as a transitional document has demonstrated surprising staying power. This panel will discuss the controversial origins of the Russian constitution, its guiding principles, and how it has entered into and influenced Russian law for the past 25 years. 

The Role of the Public Intellectual in Today’s Russia

Intellectuals have played a central role in Soviet and Russian societies. Novelists, poets, and artists had a sense of higher social mission and were viewed as “the conscience of the nation.” In today’s Russia, the demand for public intellectuals who can serve as a moral compass seems to be changing. Celebrated Russian writer Lyudmila Ulitskaya will discuss the role of the intelligentsia in contemporary Russian society.

Putin’s System: Why It is Stable and Why It Will Fail Anyway

Faced with the apparent paradox of Putin’s high level of support in the face of decreasing quality of life, many experts resort to clichés, citing the Russian citizen’s predilection for authoritarianism or apathy towards freedom. Leonid Gozman argued that this popular support has perfectly rational explanations, and how, nonetheless, the symptoms of the regime’s ultimate collapse are inherent to the system and already visible today.

This event was in Russian with English translation.

 

Ukraine and the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons

Ukrainian Foreign Ministry documents reveal the importance of the NPT in 1994 decision to denuclearize.

This year, the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT) is celebrating its 50th anniversary since it opened for signature on July 1, 1968.

Moscow in Crisis: How Will the Kremlin Respond?

BY MAXIM TRUDOLYUBOV

A Sacred Space Is Never Empty: A History of Soviet Atheism

When the Bolsheviks set out to build a new world in the wake of the Russian Revolution, they expected religion to die off. Soviet power used a variety of tools--from education to propaganda to terror—to turn its vision of a Communist world without religion into reality. Yet even with its monopoly on ideology and power, the Soviet Communist Party never succeeded in overcoming religion and creating an atheist society.

"Da, da" or "nyet, nyet"? Brezhnev, Tanaka, and the Unresolved Russo-Japanese Territorial Dispute

Judging by the frequency of meetings between Prime Minister Abe Shinzo of Japan and the Russian President Vladimir Putin, Russo-Japanese relations are as friendly and robust as they had ever been.

True, the economic indicators continue to disappoint. Bilateral trade has only just begun to recover from the steep post-2013 plunge but remains a very long way off the historic highs of 33 billion USD. Japanese foreign direct investment – about 2 billion dollars – is miserly even by Russia’s investor-unfriendly standards.

No Place for Russia: European Security Institutions Since 1989

The optimistic vision of a “Europe whole and free” after the fall of the Berlin Wall in 1989 has given way to disillusionment, bitterness, and renewed hostility between Russia and the West. In No Place for Russia, William H. Hill traces the development of the post–Cold War European security order to explain today’s tensions, showing how attempts to integrate Russia into a unified Euro-Atlantic security order were gradually overshadowed by the domination of NATO and the EU―at Russia’s expense.

Pages