South Korea | Wilson Center

South Korea

Behind Asia’s Other Trade War

While the trade war between Washington and Beijing has garnered significant attention, another trade war between two of the world’s largest and most advanced economies is heating up. Japan and South Korea are the world’s third- and twelfth-largest economies, respectively, representing an annual GDP of greater than $6.5 trillion. Yet trade friction between Tokyo and Seoul has intensified as a political standoff, rooted in history and inflamed by domestic politics on both sides, has begun to impact the economies of two critical American allies and global supply chains.

Internships with the Hyundai Motor-Korea Foundation Center for Korean History and Public Policy

Internships with the Hyundai Motor-Korea Foundation Center for Korean History and Public Policy

The Hyundai Motor-Korea Foundation Center for Korean History and Public Policy at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars seeks research assistant interns with an interest in, coursework related to, and/or experience working on South Korea and North Korea issues and/or Korean studies.

From Casting Blame to Capturing Benefits: Advancing Integrated Solutions to Air Pollution and Climate Change in Asia

Approximately 4 billion people, around 92 percent of the population in Asia and the Pacific, are exposed to levels of air pollution that pose a significant risk to their health.

Dispatches: June 2019

Welcome to Dispatches, the monthly newsletter of the Wilson Center's Asia Program. Subscribe today to make sure you never miss an issue.

Values and U.S. Policy Toward the Indo-Pacific

In recent weeks, the Trump administration has sought to address the role that values and norms should play in its foreign policy generally, and in the U.S. strategy toward the Indo-Pacific specifically. This is a reflection of a long-standing debate in American foreign policy, going back to the founding of the nation itself, but the arguments made by top U.S. officials are worth considering.

Where Does It Stand and Where Should It Shift? A South Korean Perspective on North Korea Nuclear Diplomacy

It’s the Economy, Stupid! A South Korean Version?

Politics in South Korea show a great deal of similarities with those of the United States. President Moon Jae-in has to confront the polarization of political parties and the press. The conservative opposition party is busy criticizing Moon for being weak on North Korea. The mainstream media is wasting no time in underscoring any sign of disagreements between Washington and Seoul.

South Korea’s Minister of the Interior and Safety Kim Bookyum Meets Wilson Center Scholars in Aftermath of Hanoi Summit

“What happens next?” is a key question following the breakdown of the Hanoi Summit in February 2019. In the mix of optimism and skepticism toward US-North Korea relations, South Korea’s outgoing Minister of the Interior and Safety of Republic of Korea Kim Bookyum paid a visit to the Wilson Center on March 7, 2019.

'A Stab in the Back' or 'A Pat on the Back?'

Experts and pundits in the United States and South Korea have been very busy analyzing the mystery of “Why No Deal in Hanoi.” Just as politics in America and South Korea are different, conclusions for why the summit broke down inside the two allies seem to be dissimilar as well.

Pages