Southeast Asia

Event Recap: What's Next for the Rohingya?

The Rohingya Crises may have faded from the headlines but the plight of the Rohingya remains uncertain. On April 2nd, 2019, the Asia Program hosted Dr. Nehginpao Kipgen, one of the foremost experts on Burma and the Executive Director at the Center for Southeast Asian Studies at the Jindal Global University in India to discuss recent developments with the Rohingya Community what could be in store for them in the future. In this capacity, Dr.

Remembering the Rohingya

The plight of the Rohingya community is one of the saddest, and most underreported, stories of modern times.

This Muslim community has long suffered through persecution, marginalization, and mass migration. Its numbers are highest in Burma—about a million, according to most estimates—but they also live on the fringes of society in India and in many countries across the Muslim world.

What’s Next for the Rohingya?

Join the livestream of this event on Twitter at 3 p.m. Eastern by following @TheWilsonCenter.
 

The Arc of Containment: Britain, the United States, and Anticommunism in Southeast Asia

Major studies of American foreign relations treat US failures in Vietnam as the end of both a short-lived American empire and western imperialism in Southeast Asia. Ngoei argues that Vietnam was an exception to the region’s overall pro-US trajectory after 1945, that British neo-colonialism and Southeast Asian anticommunism melded with pre-existing local antipathy toward China and the Chinese diaspora to usher the region from formal colonialism to US hegemony.

Managing the Rise of Southeast Asia's Coast Guards

Over the past few years, Southeast Asian states have begun either significantly increasing their investments in coast guards and other maritime law enforcement agencies (MLEAs) or have considered standing up new agencies. As this has occurred, there has been a rising conversation about the significance not only for these countries themselves, but for wider regional stability and for external partners such as the United States.
 

Are Sulu Sea Trilateral Patrols Actually Working?

One of the minilateral security initiatives emerging out of Southeast Asia over the past few years has been the new trilateral cooperation mechanism for managing a range of transnational challenges in the Sulu Sea between Indonesia, Malaysia, and the Philippines. With the mechanism expected to continue to take shape into 2019 as well, it is worth asking where it stands as well as the opportunities and challenges that lie ahead for it.

What To Look For in 2019: The Year Ahead in Asia

America In Search of an Asia Strategy

Bangladesh’s 2018 National Election: What To Expect

On December 30, Bangladeshis go to the polls for an election that some observers have described as its most important in years. Michael Kugelman, deputy director of the Asia Program and senior South Asia associate at the Wilson Center, and William Milam, a Wilson Center senior scholar and former U.S. ambassador to Bangladesh, sit down with Bangladeshi journalist Mushfiqul Fazal to discusses what’s at stake for Bangladesh and what the implications are for U.S. policy and interests.

The Chinese Communist Party’s Relationship with the Khmer Rouge in the 1970s: An Ideological Victory and a Strategic Failure

To download this Working Paper, please click here.

CWIHP Working Paper 88

The Chinese Communist Party’s Relationship with the Khmer Rouge in the 1970s: An Ideological Victory and a Strategic Failure

 

Wang Chenyi

December 2018

 

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