Soviet Union

China’s Alliances with North Korea and the Soviet Union: A Conversation with China’s Leading Historians

The Wilson Center’s History and Public Policy Program is pleased to host China’s three leading diplomatic historians for a discussion about the history and present day relevance of China’s Cold War-era relations with North Korea and the Soviet Union.

"Da, da" or "nyet, nyet"? Brezhnev, Tanaka, and the Unresolved Russo-Japanese Territorial Dispute

Judging by the frequency of meetings between Prime Minister Abe Shinzo of Japan and the Russian President Vladimir Putin, Russo-Japanese relations are as friendly and robust as they had ever been.

True, the economic indicators continue to disappoint. Bilateral trade has only just begun to recover from the steep post-2013 plunge but remains a very long way off the historic highs of 33 billion USD. Japanese foreign direct investment – about 2 billion dollars – is miserly even by Russia’s investor-unfriendly standards.

The Prague Spring: Dubček, the Media, and Mass Demoralisation

In his novel The Book of Laughter and Forgetting (1981), the Czech-French author Milan Kundera, originally a communist, describes the 1948 communist takeover and subsequent developments thus:

The East European '1968' and its Legacies

We are now half a century on from the tumultuous events of the year 1968: the Tet Offensive in Vietnam, the assassinations of Martin Luther King and Robert Kennedy, the Cultural Revolution in China, the Prague Spring and the resulting Warsaw Pact invasion of Czechoslovakia, and, above all, student unrest across Europe and the wider world.

Inching into and out of the "Prague Spring"

The political thaw in Czechoslovakia known as the “Prague Spring” of 1968 is usually commemorated by the anniversary of the epochal event that punctuated it, the Soviet-led invasion on the night of 20-21 August. It is a convenient moment to fix on, full of high drama and powerful images (the photographs by Josef Koudelka are works of art as well as journalism).

Central Asia and the Global Cold War

A View from Russian and Tajikistani Archives

 

On May, 1, 1960, Francis Gary Powers took off in a U-2 spy plane from an airbase in Pakistan, flew over Afghanistan and into Soviet airspace, where he proceeded to photograph industrial and military installations before being shot down near Cheliabinsk, in Siberia.

One Name, One Life, One Symbol: The Last Address Project

In this edition of Wilson Center NOW we speak with Sergey Parkhomenko, Kennan Institute expert as well as a journalist, publisher, and founder of several projects aimed at developing civic activism and promoting liberal values in Russia. He discusses Posledny Adres (Last Address), a civil campaign dedicated to creating a collective memorial to the victims of political repression in the Soviet Union and Russia. 

 Guest

21 Newly Translated Soviet Documents on North Korea, 1968-1969

The North Korea International Documentation Project (NKIDP), a part of the Wilson Center's History and Public Policy Program, has just published translations of 21 documents from the archives of the former Soviet Union. The records, which come from the Russian State Archive of Contemporary History (RGANI), deal with a number of subjects, including North Korean decision-making during the USS Pueblo and EC-121 crises, North Korea-China relations during the Sino-Soviet split and China's Cultural Revolution, the Kim Il Sung cult, and economic conditions inside of the DPRK.

How Stalin Elevated the Chinese Communist Party to Power in Xinjiang in 1949

Records just added to DigitalArchive.org show that Soviet aid (along with military cunning, political skill and some luck) enabled the 1949 PLA invasion

The Chinese People’s Liberation Army invasion in October 1949 of Xinjiang, the vast “province” bordering the Mongolian People’s Republic and Soviet Central Asia, was a stunning development.

Pages