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Soviet Union

“An Explosion Occurred in Power Unit No. 4”: The Story of Chernobyl in Documents

Image: The first photograph of Unit Four after the accident, shot from a helicopter by Chernobyl plant photographer Anatoly Rasskazov, at approximately 3.00pm on April 26 1986 (Anatoly Rasskazov/Ukrainian National Chernobyl Museum).

"Is the Possibility of a Third World War Real?" Researching Nuclear Ukraine in the KGB Archive

NPIHP Working Paper #13

"Is the Possibility of a Third World War Real?" Researching Nuclear Ukraine in the KGB Archive

Nate Jones

March 2019

 

Forgotten Parties to the INF

On February 2, 2019, US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo announced the United States’ decision to withdraw from the Intermediate Nuclear Forces (INF) Treaty, citing the Russian Federation’s material breach of the Treaty as justification for the decision.

According to Article XV of the Treaty, the United States will suspend its obligations under the Treaty 60 days after providing notice, unless in this time, Russia agrees to come in compliance.

INF Suspended: Have the U.S. and Russia Entered a New Arms Race?

In this edition of Wilson Center NOW we are joined by Matthew Rojansky, Director of the Wilson Center’s Kennan Institute, who discusses President Trump's announcement of U.S. withdrawal from the Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces (INF) Treaty.  What are the implications for U.S.-Russia relations moving forward and how will this affect current and future international arms control efforts?

Guest

From Peter the Great to Putin: The Evolution of Russian Law

In this edition of Wilson Center NOW we are joined by William Pomeranz, Deputy Director of the Wilson Center’s Kennan Institute, who discusses his new book Law and the Russian State: Russia's Legal Evolution from Peter the Great to Vladimir Putin. Pomeranz examines continuities and disruptions of Russian law during the imperial, Soviet, and post-Soviet periods.

Vladimir Putin’s Stasi ID: A Press Sensation and Its Historical Reality

Recently, a press sensation began in Germany and spread across the globe when an identification card from the East German Ministry of State Security (MfS, or Stasi) was found in the Stasi Records Archive with the name and picture of the Russian President Vladimir Putin.

(On a personal note, I did not find the ID card, despite some early press reports to the contrary.)

It has been a well-known fact that Putin served from 1985 to 1990 as a KGB officer in Dresden; now, some journalists decided, he had worked for the Stasi as well!

The Kremlin Letters: Stalin’s Wartime Correspondence with Churchill and Roosevelt

Stalin exchanged more than six hundred messages with Allied leaders Churchill and Roosevelt during the Second World War. In this riveting volume—the fruit of a unique British-Russian scholarly collaboration—the messages are published and also analyzed within their historical context.

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