Soviet Union | Wilson Center

Soviet Union

Book Talk: The House of the Dead: Siberian Exile Under the Tsars

In his new book, The House of the Dead: Siberian Exile Under the Tsars, Daniel Beer discusses how the tsarist regime attempted to use the open prison of Siberia

Familiar Strangers: The Georgian Diaspora and the Evolution of Soviet Empire

In his new book Familiar Strangers, Dr. Erik R. Scott reinterprets the course of modern Russian and Soviet history. Scott contests the portrayal of the Soviet Union as a Russian-led empire composed of separate national republics and instead argues that it was an empire of diasporas.

The 1980 Moscow Olympics Boycott

US Olympic Committee votes to boycott Moscow Olympics, following Soviet invasion of Afghanistan

Book Talk: The Man with the Poison Gun

In The Man with the Poison Gun: A Cold War Spy Story, Harvard historian Serhii Plokhy, one of the foremost experts of the former Soviet Union, brings to life the story of Bogdan Stashinsky, the spy whose defection, confession, and subsequent trial would change the face of Cold War espionage.

The Last Superpower Summits: Gorbachev, Reagan, and Bush: Conversations that Ended the Cold War

The Last Superpower Summits: Gorbachev, Reagan, and Bush: Conversations that Ended the Cold War publishes the fullest verbatim account ever in print of the historic summit meetings between the American and Soviet leaders – Ronald Reagan, Mikhail Gorbachev, and George H.W.

The Soviet Union in the Horn of Africa

Documents reveal Moscow found itself in the Horn of Africa not by imposition but by invitation

From Post-Soviet to Neo-Soviet

In a series of polls conducted at various points over the past 25 years, the Levada Center has asked Russians about their nostalgia for the Soviet state and the reasons for its breakup. In the most recent sample (November 2016), 56 percent of respondents expressed regret about the Union’s collapse. This figure peaked in December 2000 at three quarters of those surveyed and has been above 50 percent all but once over the past quarter century (49 percent in the December 2012 sample).

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