Sudan | Wilson Center

Sudan

A Poisonous Thorn in Our Hearts: Sudan and South Sudan's Bitter and Incomplete Divorce

The Woodrow Wilson Center’s Africa Program is pleased to invite you to a book launch and discussion with James Copnall, author of A Poisonous Thorn in Our Hearts: Sudan and South Sudan's Bitter and Incomplete Divorce.

When South Sudan became independent in July 2011, two new nations were born, South Sudan and Sudan. In the years after separation, the two Sudans dealt with crippling economic challenges, struggled with new and old rebellions, and fought each other along their disputed border.

Peacebuilding and Statebuilding in the Horn of Africa

On 10 April 2014, the Woodrow Wilson Center's Africa and Global Europe Programs hosted Finland’s Minister of International Development, H.E. Pekka Haavisto, in a roundtable that examined challenges, analyzed lessons learned, and offered recommendations on the way forward on peacebuilding and state-building in the Horn of Africa.
 

Dr. Monde Muyangwa Appointed to Head Wilson Center’s Africa Program

WASHINGTON—The Woodrow Wilson Center announced today that Dr. Monde Muyangwa will be the new director of the center’s Africa Program.

“Dr. Muyangwa is a serious, highly-regarded Africa-hand.” said Wilson Center Director, President, and CEO Jane Harman. “She made her mark as a Vice President at the National Summit on Africa, which produced key recommendations for strengthening US-Africa relations in the 21st Century.  She will build on the extraordinary work of Howard Wolpe and Steve McDonald.”

South Sudan: A Way to End Conflict?

Simmering political and ethnic rivalries in South Sudan have erupted in open conflict. Over a thousand people have been killed, and many hundreds of thousands more have been displaced, seeking refuge in Uganda, Sudan or UN camps in South Sudan. Peace talks between the rebels and government in Addis Ababa have stalled.

Does this mean that South Sudan has failed? Can the talks produce a truce and meaningful discussion of the way ahead? How can the international community play a more constructive role?

Crisis in South Sudan (This event will be held at USIP)

PLEASE BE ADVISED THAT THIS EVENT WILL TAKE PLACE AT USIP AND NOT THE WILSON CENTER.

In order to attend, please RSVP here.

 

Risk and Resilience: Sudan’s Livelihoods Challenge

Sudan’s pastoralists gained infamy during the conflict in Darfur last decade, when outsiders described the violence as a result of competition between climate-stressed, semi-nomadic herders and sedentary farmers. But Sudan’s pastoralists may not be as fragile as previously thought and could even hold the key to survival for similar groups in Africa, said a panel of experts at the Wilson Center on November 13.

Conference Report: African Women and Youth as Agents of Change through Technology and Innovation

On May 1, 2013, the Africa Program and the Project on Leadership and Building State Capacity (Leadership Project) at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars (Wilson Center) sought to highlight some of the exciting developments by women and youth in Africa utilizing technology and social innovations to tackle every day issues.

The Quarterly Report: Memories of a Sudanese Child Slave

On this episode of Dialogue at the Wilson Center we once again turn our focus to the Wilson Center’s flagship publication, the Wilson Quarterly with the help of its editor Steve Lagerfeld. Also joining us is author Melissa Pritchard.

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