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Sudan

A Briefing by The Honorable Raila A. Odinga: African Achievements and Challenges: Learning from the Past but Looking Forward

I dream of continent that will long have consigned poverty to history. It will have a youthful, skilled and healthy population, and will serve as a granary, factory floor and supplier to the world. It will be a continent that has made the 21st century its own, and whose key development indicators match global standards. The Honorable Raila Odinga

Fifty Years of the African Union

The Woodrow Wilson Center Announces 2013 – 2014 Fellowship Class

WASHINGTON—Jane Harman, director, president & CEO of the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, announced the members of the 2013-2014 fellowship class. The 21 fellows, most of whom are expected to start September 2013 to spend an academic year in residence at the Center, include scholars and practitioners from the United States, Germany, Hungary, Israel, Japan, Kyrgyzstan, the Netherlands, and New Zealand.

A Crisis of Governance in South Sudan

“The seeds were sown for good government… but there is still a long way to go” – Lual A. Deng

Overview

Climate Change Adaptation and Peacebuilding in Africa: An Adaptation Partnership Workshop Report

On Thursday, November 1 and Friday November 2, 2012, USAID and the U.S. Department of State, in partnership with the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, Institute for Security Studies (Africa Program, Project on Leadership and Building State Capacity and the Environmental Change and Security Program), and IRG/Engility, convened a select group of experts, practitioners, and policymakers from both the United States and Africa in Washington, DC for a conference focused on the third area of concern – climate change adaptation (CCA) and peacebuilding in Africa.

How Should America Respond to Economic Opportunities in Africa?

U.S. policy toward Africa has been on autopilot for much of the past four years, following a laundry list of good intentions that established priorities for Africa’s well-being and U.S. security interests. However, a truly sustainable and forward-looking U.S. policy toward Africa should refocus attention on Africa’s opportunity as an economic powerhouse of the future, a strategy that combines both domestic self-interest and an opportunity to help Africa move forward.

Africa’s Long Spring

Long before it came to the Arab world, spring swept through sub-Saharan Africa. In 1990, Mozambique drafted its first multiparty, democratic constitution. The next year saw multiparty elections in what had been one-party states in Benin, Gabon, and Zambia, as well as the overthrow of Mali’s dictator and, subsequently, the election of new leaders. Every succeeding year brought new steps forward for democracy—in Ghana, Kenya, and the Republic of the Congo in 1992, and elsewhere on the continent in subsequent years.

Africa Rising

For decades, much of the news about Africa was negative. From disease and famine to horrific violence, the continent has certainly endured its share of problems. And while challenges remain, positive trends are leading to increasing good news from across the African continent. To learn more about those trends and developments, and also about U.S. involvement with the nations of Africa, we spoke with Johnnie Carson, a former ambassador to three African nations who currently serves as Assistant Secretary of State for the State Department’s Bureau of African Affairs.

Director's Forum: The United States – Africa Partnership: The Last Four Years and Beyond

ASSISTANT SECRETARY CARSON: Thank you. Thank you very, very much. I want to thank Michael for his opening remarks and his very, very kind introduction. He’s right; we have known one another and have been friends for many, many years, and it’s a pleasure to have him introduce me today.

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