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Who “Owns” The Arctic?: An International and Interdisciplinary Conference [Chapel Hill, NC]

The Wilson Center’s Canada Institute and Kennan Institute, with the Center for Canadian Studies at Duke University, joined UNC Chapel Hill’s Center for Slavic, Eurasian, and East European Studies (CSEEES) to host Who “Owns” The Arctic?: An International and Interdisciplinary Conference on March 28, 2012 in Chapel Hill, North Carolina.

U.S. and British Combined to Delay Pakistani Nuclear Weapons Program in 1978-1981, Declassified Documents Show

The United States and Great Britain undertook a secret diplomatic campaign in the late 1970s to prevent a major nuclear proliferation threat – Pakistan’s attempted covert purchasing of “gray area” technology for its nuclear weapons program – according to recently declassified “NODIS” (no distribution) State department telegrams published today by the National Security Archive.

Local Consequences of the Global Cold War

Up to now the study of cold war history has been fully engaged in stressing the international character and broad themes of the story. This volume turns such diplomatic history upside down by studying how actions of international relations affected local popular life.

Economic Cold War: America's Embargo against China and the Sino-Soviet Alliance, 1949-1963

Why would one country impose economic sanctions against another in pursuit of foreign policy objectives? How effective is the use of economic weapons in attaining such objectives? To answer these questions, the author examines how and why the United States and its allies instituted economic sanctions against the People’s Republic of China in the 1950s, and how the embargo affected Chinese domestic policy and the Sino-Soviet alliance.

Kinship and Capitalism: Marriage, Family, and Business in the English-speaking World, 1580-1740

This uncompromisingly empirical study reconstructs the public and private lives of urban business families during the period of England’s emergence as a world economic power. Using a broad cross-section of archival, rather than literary, sources, it tests the orthodox view that the family as an institution was transformed by capitalism and individualism. The approach is both quantitative and qualitative. A database of 28,000 families has been constructed to tackle questions such as demographic structure, kinship, and inheritance, which must be answered statistically.

Churchill as Peacemaker

Winston Churchill had an acute appreciation of what belongs to war and what belongs to peace. We tend to remember his resistance to Nazi tyranny during the Second World War and his actions as a man of war. In this book, scholars from the United States, Great Britain, and South Africa examine his other actions and comments, those that reflect the primary focus of Churchill’s long career: his attempts to keep and restore peace throughout the world, from Queen Victoria’s little wars to the Cold War.

The Historical Imagination in Early Modern Britain: History, Rhetoric, and Fiction, 1500-1800

These essays by some of the most distinguished historians and literary scholars in the English-speaking world explore the overlap, interplay, and interaction between supposedly truthful history and fact-based fiction in British writing from the Tudor period to the Enlightenment. Despite the many theoretical questions posed, the discussions primarily focus on concrete works, including those of Thomas More, John Foxe, Thomas Hobbes, Adam Smith, and Edward Gibbon.

Thatcher on Gorbachev, 1985 (0:35)

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