United States

The Hidden Cost of China-U.S. Trade: Water

In this edition of Wilson Center NOW we are joined by Danielle Neighbour, Schwarzman Fellow at the Kissinger Institute and China Environment Forum. She discusses how the US-China trade war is shifting the balance of how water is exchanged between the two nations and how “virtual water” plays a significant role in the global goods trade.

Guest

Engineering an Endgame in Afghanistan

Last year, Pathways to Change – Pakistan Policy Symposium, a two-day event jointly organized by the Wilson Center and INDUS, convened expert scholars, academics, and practitioners from the United States and Pakistan to explore Pakistan’s recent achievements in economic, political, and foreign affairs as well as its opportunities to address current and future challenges. Speakers and panelists focused on identifying practical, innovative, and above all actionable policy solutions.

Bringing More Stability to a Misunderstood Relationship

Last year, Pathways to Change – Pakistan Policy Symposium, a two-day event jointly organized by the Wilson Center and INDUS, convened expert scholars, academics, and practitioners from the United States and Pakistan to explore Pakistan’s recent achievements in economic, political, and foreign affairs as well as its opportunities to address current and future challenges. Speakers and panelists focused on identifying practical, innovative, and above all actionable policy solutions.

The Way Forward for Pakistan-U.S. Relations: A Pakistani Perspective

Last year, Pathways to Change – Pakistan Policy Symposium, a two-day event jointly organized by the Wilson Center and INDUS, convened expert scholars, academics, and practitioners from the United States and Pakistan to explore Pakistan’s recent achievements in economic, political, and foreign affairs as well as its opportunities to address current and future challenges. Speakers and panelists focused on identifying practical, innovative, and above all actionable policy solutions.

In 2012, Kim Jong Un put his father’s plans on rapprochement with U.S. on hold; is 2019 the year he carries out Kim Jong Il’s mission?

Image: North Korean diplomat Kim Hyok Chol at the New York Stock Exchange in June 2011 (Photo credit: Jean H. Lee)

Some years ago, I invited a group of North Koreans to meet me in New York to negotiate the opening of the first U.S. news bureau in Pyongyang. Among them was a mid-career diplomat being groomed to handle North American affairs. His name: Kim Hyok Chol.

Event Recap: On the Brink: Trump, Kim, and the Threat of Nuclear War

More than six decades have passed since the signing of the Korean War Armistice Agreement halted the bloodshed on the Korean Peninsula. Although war between the two Koreas was put on pause, the promise of peace remains elusive to this day. Painfully aware of its vulnerability to its southern neighbor and the U.S. forces stationed there, North Korea began its nuclear program in the 1950s. Despite years of nuclear negotiations between the United States, North Korea, and other concerned parties, North Korea has persisted in its quest to obtain a reliable nuclear deterrent.

Event Recap: Geopolitical Implications of Diplomatic Failure with North Korea

The first U.S.-North Korea summit under the Trump administration left some concerned about the possible withdrawal of American troops from South Korea. Though North Korea promised to denuclearize, progress was minimal.  The outcome of the second summit meeting between Donald Trump and Kim Jong-un will pose deep implications for the already influenced geopolitics of the Korean Peninsula and the greater region. 

Mexico Institute Experts React to El Chapo Verdict

Duncan Wood, Director, Mexico Institute:

"More important than the conviction or the sentencing will be the information that Guzmán has shared with U.S. authorities. If it is reliable, then it could be employed to better understand how organized crime operates in Mexico, who the most important players are, and how best to hit the bottom line of drug trafficking organizations."

Christopher Wilson, Deputy Director, Mexico Institute: 

Mexico's Role in the Deadly Rise of Fentanyl

Executive Summary

Since surging into the market in 2013, fentanyl has become the most lethal category of opioid in the United States. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimated that more than 47,000 people died from an opioid overdose in 2017 in the United States—28,000 of those deaths were due to synthetic opioids, which the CDC says is largely the result of the uptick in abuse of fentanyl.

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