Diplomatic History

Special Envoys, “Silos” and Coherent International Policy

Secretary of State Pompeo recently appointed four special envoys to help him manage high priority portfolios regarding Iran, Afghanistan, Syria, and North Korea.

Exhibition Opening: Czechs and Slovaks on Their Difficult Road to Peace and Independence

The Wilson Center is pleased to host an opening exhibition with the Embassy of the Czech Republic and the Embassy of the Slovak Republic commemorating the centennial anniversary of the founding of Czechoslovakia. 

World War I redrew the map of Europe, resulting in newly independent countries including Czechoslovakia. Delve into period photographs and newspaper clippings, accompanied by historical analysis, to deepen your understanding of the quest for independence, whether in politics or in combat, by the Czechs, Slovaks, and their supporters abroad.

A Misunderstood Friendship: Mao Zedong, Kim Il-Sung, and Sino-North Korean Relations, 1949-1976

Today, the People's Republic of China is North Korea's only ally on the world stage, a tightly knit relationship that goes back decades.

Missing—but not forgotten: What the return of Korean War remains means for the daughter of one American soldier

Donna Knox never met her father. She was born two months after he disappeared in North Korea in 1952 at age 26, a star collegiate hockey player for the University of Michigan who was the father of a young son and a daughter on the way.

Still, he loomed large in their lives as his wife and children waited for word on his whereabouts.

Next Steps with Pyongyang

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo’s latest trip to Pyongyang was a collision between the exaggerated claims made by President Trump following his summit meeting in Singapore with Kim Jong-un and the realities of diplomacy with North Korea.

New Year, New Strategy: Shifting Policies on North Korea in 2018

After more than a year of escalating tensions over North Korea’s nuclear provocations and a war of words between Kim Jong Un and Donald Trump, we have seen an abrupt shift in strategy on the Korean Peninsula. Declaring himself content with North Korea’s nuclear weapons arsenal in late 2017, Kim Jong Un began 2018 with a new approach: diplomatic outreach. A summit between Kim and ROK President Moon Jae-in inside the Demilitarized Zone will be held later this month, the first inter-Korean summit in more than a decade.

Death of a Bromance?

As Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe prepares to visit Washington later this month, it’s clear that his upcoming meeting with President Trump won’t be an easy one, to say the least. At his previous meetings with the U.S. president, issues of potential conflict were averted to concentrate instead on the positive relationship. This time around, though, conflict will be inevitable since there will be a number of must-gets by Abe in order for the talks to be deemed as a success.

When Trump Meets Kim

The long-simmering crisis between North Korea and the United States has reached a new, consequential phase. President Trump’s decision to meet with North Korean leader Kim Jong-un will be a decisive moment in a struggle that has lasted since the United States first suspected North Korea of harboring nuclear ambitions in the 1980s. Regardless of how the summit may transpire, one thing is clear: this challenge, and the geopolitics of East Asia, will never be the same again.
 

Eyes on Mongolia as Uncertainties in Asia Rise

Rich in natural resources but land-locked. A young democracy but an ancient civilization that has shaped regional history. A nation at the heart of Asia but sandwiched between two major powers.

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