Population

Discussion with Assistant Secretary of State for African Affairs, Ambassador Tibor Nagy

On Tuesday, August 21, 2018, the Wilson Center Africa Program hosted a discussion with Ambassador Tibor Nagy, the newly confirmed Assistant Secretary of State for African Affairs. The event was an opportunity for the Assistant Secretary to introduce himself to and share his priorities for U.S.-Africa policy with the Africa-engaged community, and for him to hear their viewpoints, interests, and concerns about the current state and the way forward for U.S.-Africa policy and relations.

Demographic Challenges in Asian Pensions

Paying for pensions is vital to the quality of life for future retirees in Asia.  It's also an issue of great political and economic importance to current and future policy makers in the region.  They are currently wrestling with the dual problems of growing population in the poorest of countries while more developed Asia powers face the quickly approaching reality of rapid aging and declining population. 

Learning to Become Turkmen: Literacy, Language, and Power, 1914-2014

Learning to Become Turkmen examines the ways in which the iconography of everyday life--in dramatically different alphabets, multiple languages, and shifting education policies--reflects the evolution of Turkmen society in Central Asia over the past century. As Victoria Clement shows, the formal structures of the Russian imperial state did not affect Turkmen cultural formations nearly as much as Rusian language and Cyrillic script. Their departure was also as transformative to Turkmen politics and society as their arrival.

New Polling Data from Mexico: Does Positive Opinion of the U.S. Depend on Progress in NAFTA Talks?

The Venezuelan Refugee Crisis - The Brazilian Perspective

Special Weekly Asado - Labor Discord

Poll: Mexicans' View of United States Hits Record Low

In a stunning reversal, a 65 percent majority of Mexicans hold an unfavorable view of the United States, compared to 66 percent holding a favorable view in 2015, according to new public opinion research from the Chicago Council on Global Affairs, Buendia & Laredo, and the Wilson Center's Mexico Institute. This survey, taken near the end of Donald Trump's first year in office, marks the first time in two decades that a majority of Mexicans hold an unfavorable view of the United States.

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