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Nuclear Weapons

Double Jeopardy: Combating Nuclear Terror and Climate Change

As the consequences of climate change grow ever more dire, it seems imperative that we use every alternative to carbon-based fuels—but does this include nuclear energy? 
 

Q&A: Can North Korea and the U.S. strike a nuclear deal?

This article is part of the World Economic Forum's Geostrategy platform

After two high-profile summits between President Donald Trump and Kim Jong Un, both sides still appear to be far apart on the issue of nuclear disarmament. Have the talks reached stalemate, and what is the significance of Chinese President Xi Jinping’s recent state visit to Pyongyang? Is there still hope of a successful agreement?

Flash Analysis: Chinese President Xi Jinping's Visit to North Korea

On June 20th, Chinese President Xi Jinping is scheduled to make a two day state visit to North Korea.  While Kim Jong Un has traveled to China several times over the last year, this will be Xi's first trip to Pyongyang.  Three Wilson Center experts offer their analysis of the implications and potential outcomes.

 

Jean H. Lee, director of the Hyundai Motor-Korea Foundation Center for Korean History and Public Policy:

North Korea: What Everyone Needs To Know

After a year of trading colorful barbs with the American president and significant achievements in North Korea's decades-long nuclear and missile development programs, North Korean leader Kim Jong Un declared mission accomplished in November 2017. Though Kim's pronouncement appears premature, North Korea is on the verge of being able to strike the United States with nuclear weapons. South Korea has long been in the North Korean crosshairs but worries whether the United States would defend it if North Korea holds the American homeland at risk.

Geopolitical Implications of a New Era on the Korean Peninsula

The second summit meeting between the United States and the DPRK in Vietnam ended without a deal.
 
There is yet no roadmap on how denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula might be possible, nor is there a clear way for North Korea to be able to join the fold of the international community and have sanctions lifted. In short, a great number of uncertainties remain while hopes for peace continue to be strong.
 

Where Does It Stand and Where Should It Shift? A South Korean Perspective on North Korea Nuclear Diplomacy

It’s the Economy, Stupid! A South Korean Version?

Politics in South Korea show a great deal of similarities with those of the United States. President Moon Jae-in has to confront the polarization of political parties and the press. The conservative opposition party is busy criticizing Moon for being weak on North Korea. The mainstream media is wasting no time in underscoring any sign of disagreements between Washington and Seoul.

Is There a Pot of Gold at the End of the Rainbow?

“The Trump administration suggests that there is a pot of gold at the end of the rainbow. The Kim regime believes that it can’t chase rainbows. In the end, what matters is not the size of the deal, but the sincerity of the commitment.”

'A Stab in the Back' or 'A Pat on the Back?'

Experts and pundits in the United States and South Korea have been very busy analyzing the mystery of “Why No Deal in Hanoi.” Just as politics in America and South Korea are different, conclusions for why the summit broke down inside the two allies seem to be dissimilar as well.

The Next India-Pakistan Crisis Will Be Worse

The last few days have been downright scary in South Asia.

India and Pakistan, the only two rivals in the world to be both neighbors and nuclear states, have suffered through their most serious crisis in nearly twenty years.

In 2012, Kim Jong Un put his father’s plans on rapprochement with U.S. on hold; is 2019 the year he carries out Kim Jong Il’s mission?

Image: North Korean diplomat Kim Hyok Chol at the New York Stock Exchange in June 2011 (Photo credit: Jean H. Lee)

Some years ago, I invited a group of North Koreans to meet me in New York to negotiate the opening of the first U.S. news bureau in Pyongyang. Among them was a mid-career diplomat being groomed to handle North American affairs. His name: Kim Hyok Chol.

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