Cold War

The Emir Farid Chehab Collection Launch

On Thursday, September 6, the History and Public Policy Program hosted a panel discussion to mark the launch of its latest addition the Digital Archive: The Emir Farid Chehab Collection. The panel featured Amb. Richard Murphy, Dr. Paul Salem (Middle East Institute), and Prof. Ziad Abu-Rish (Ohio University) and was moderated by Kate Seelye (Middle East Institute). Youmna Asseily and Hares Shehab, the children of the collection’s namesake, Emir Farid Chehab, also participated in the discussion.

China’s Alliances with North Korea and the Soviet Union: A Conversation with China’s Leading Historians

The Wilson Center’s History and Public Policy Program is pleased to host China’s three leading diplomatic historians for a discussion about the history and present day relevance of China’s Cold War-era relations with North Korea and the Soviet Union.

"Da, da" or "nyet, nyet"? Brezhnev, Tanaka, and the Unresolved Russo-Japanese Territorial Dispute

Judging by the frequency of meetings between Prime Minister Abe Shinzo of Japan and the Russian President Vladimir Putin, Russo-Japanese relations are as friendly and robust as they had ever been.

True, the economic indicators continue to disappoint. Bilateral trade has only just begun to recover from the steep post-2013 plunge but remains a very long way off the historic highs of 33 billion USD. Japanese foreign direct investment – about 2 billion dollars – is miserly even by Russia’s investor-unfriendly standards.

Haunted by Chaos: China’s Grand Strategy from Mao Zedong to Xi Jinping

Before the Chinese Communist Party took power, China lay broken. Today it is a force on the global stage, but remains haunted by the past.

North Korea and Grenada: Unlikely Allies United by Anti-Imperialism, 1979-1983

During the Cold War era, North Korean leader Kim Il Sung saw the world as divided between small and big countries. According to Kim, the big countries, especially the United States, used the small countries in an exploitative fashion and engaged in ruthless imperialism.

From Plowshares to Swords: The United States’ Shift from Nuclear to Conventional Deterrence

The Cuban Missile Crisis almost drove the world into thermonuclear war. However, the Berlin Crisis of 1961 redefined the United States’ strategy of deterrence by emphasizing US conventional forces over nuclear weapons. This new approach to deterrence helped address the balance of power between the United States and the Soviet Union, but at the cost of a military-industrial complex that became permanently established within the United States’ political economy. 

The August 1968 Red Square Protest and Its Legacy

Fifty years ago tomorrow, an act of great moral courage occurred against the backdrop of the Cold War.  On August 25, 1968, four days after hundreds of thousands of Soviet and Warsaw Pact troops poured into Czechoslovakia to crush the reforms of the Prague Spring, eight Soviet citizens went into Moscow’s Red Square and held up banners denouncing the invasion and apologizing to the people of Czechoslovakia.

The Prague Spring: Dubček, the Media, and Mass Demoralisation

In his novel The Book of Laughter and Forgetting (1981), the Czech-French author Milan Kundera, originally a communist, describes the 1948 communist takeover and subsequent developments thus:

Pages