ISIS

The Sinai: Jihadism's Latest Frontline

Evan W. Burt

Updated November 2017
 

Mosul after ISIS: Whither U.S. Policy in Iraq?

The liberation of Mosul from ISIS control is a major win for the Iraqi government, the United States, and the campaign to defeat the terrorist group – but a critically important question now looms: What comes next for U.S. policy toward a country divided and tattered from years of war?

The War on ISIS: The Forgotten Need for Congressional Authorization

In the words of Defense Secretary James Mattis, the war on ISIS has shifted into the “annihilation” phase. While there is broad consensus for aggressively pursuing the terrorist group, the legal grounds upon which the president can expand the use of military force against ISIS are more tenuous.

Tensions in the Gulf: Implications for U.S. Policy

The dramatic decision by Saudi Arabia, key Gulf states, and others to isolate Qatar is part of a deeper problem that has been brewing for years. How big a challenge does this recent turn of events, including the first major ISIS attack in Iran, portend for U.S. policy and interests in the region? Is this just a headline or does it represent a significant trend line that could reshape Arab politics and power balances?

In this ground truth briefing, three veteran analysts and practitioners of U.S. policy in the Gulf and the region share their views on these and other matters. 

Alumni Work Among New York Times Most Notable Books of 2016

Assessing ISIS Expansion in Southeast Asia: Major Threat or Misplaced Fear?

In an era of international terrorism and the rise of large, well-organized Islamic jihadist groups working hard to violently establish strict conservative Islamic states, the need for continually evolving threat assessments becomes paramount for the safety of lives and assets. One such threat assessment to evaluate is the vulnerability of the Southeast Asian region as a possible new theater for the expansion of the jihadist group known as the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria (ISIS).

White House Update on Counter-ISIS Campaign

On December 13, the U.S. Special Envoy for the Global Coalition to Counter ISIL (also known as the Islamic State, Daesh or ISIS), Brett McGurk, gave an update on the group’s loss of territory, leaders, fighters, revenue and more. The following are excerpts from his briefing.

Special Presidential Envoy for the Global Coalition to Counter ISIL Brett McGurk

 

The Evolving Threat of Violent Extremism: Getting Ahead of the Curve

The West failed to predict the emergence of al Qaeda in new forms across the Middle East and North Africa. It was blindsided by ISIS's sweep across Syria and Iraq, a blow that changed the map of the Middle East, at least temporarily. Both movements skillfully continue to evolve—and surprise. They have produced dozens of franchises, expanding the threat globally. A new U.S. administration faces daunting tests in navigating violent extremism and the related policy problems. Please join the U.S.

The Jihadi Threat 6: Policy Considerations

The Muslim world is in a deep state of flux. A confluence of trends—ideological, geostrategic, sectarian, demographic, economic, and social—will shape the future of jihadism. In crafting policies to deal with jihadi movements, the United States and its allies face complex challenges. They cannot fight terrorism by simply “fighting” terrorism. Military means can disrupt, but they can’t permanently dismantle or reverse a trend initially spawned by deep political discontent.

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