ISIS

Erdogan’s Foreign Policy Is in Ruins

It wasn’t long ago that Turkish foreign policy was the talk of the town. Defined by the catchy phrase of “zero problems with the neighbors,” Turkey aimed to both improve relations with its neighborhood and slowly emerge as the dominant regional power. It was a classic case of enhancing soft power through democratization and economic reforms at home, coupled with shrewd diplomacy aimed at establishing Ankara as a mediator in the region’s conflicts.

'Canada’s Fast-Track Refugee Plan: Unanswered Questions and Implications for U.S. National Security': Laura Dawson Testifies before U.S. Senate Committee on Homeland Security & Governmental Affairs

Testimony As Prepared

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Canada’s Fast-Track Refugee Plan: Unanswered Questions and Implications for U.S. National Security

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Missing From Geneva Talks: A Process That Could Lead to Peace in Syria

Peace conferences are usually good for two things: starting a credible process or ending one. What’s happening in Geneva, ostensibly aimed at stopping the conflict in Syria, lacks sufficient buy-in from key parties to produce either result.

Killing Jihadist Hackers Sets a Flawed Precedent

For much of the early 2000s, the worst job in terrorism was “Al Qaeda’s third-in-command.” During one hot streak, as Timothy Noah reported, the United States killed four of the men in that seat in as many years. Today, in one sign of how much warfare has since evolved, individuals who lead Islamic State hacking efforts have an even shorter life expectancy. With the recent announcement that a U.S.

To Defeat ISIS, Listen to the Women

This article was originally published here in The Hill.

In a world inundated with news, information and entertainment, it is easy to miss something important or to forget about it. We hear about the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria (ISIS) on a near-daily basis because its media operation is sophisticated and omnipresent. We see the terror organization's soldiers, guns, bullets, bombs and beheadings. We see its victims.

Is America Losing the Kurds?

Amid the uncertainty shrouding the latest UN-brokered Syrian peace talks, one thing is already clear: Syria’s Kurds, who control a sizeable chunk of the country’s border with Turkey, are being excluded yet again, triggering feelings of betrayal and anger that could weaken the fight against the Islamic State (ISIS).

Many point the finger of blame at Turkey and its ruling Islamists who successfully blocked the Kurds from participating in previous rounds of talks.

A U.S. Blueprint for Syria

A friend who works in the Obama Administration recently lamented that the Russians are always a step ahead of us when it comes to Syria and the Middle East. If we are wondering why this is the case, the answer is simple: Moscow knows exactly what it wants in Syria and we do not. The time has come for the U.S. government, with selected allies, to publicly offer what it thinks a comprehensive solution to the Syrian crisis should look like. As suggested below, even if the proposition put forth here does not end up as the ultimate outcome, it is important for the U.S.

Former Scholar Hussain Nadim Recognized in Forbes Magazine 30 Under 30 Law and Policy Global Leaders

Hussain Nadim, the current founding director of the Peace and Development Unit of Pakistan's Ministry of Planning Development and Reforms, and former visiting scholar at the Wilson Center's Asia Program, has been recognized as one of the 30 Under 30 Global Leaders in Law and Policy by Forbes Magazine.

Conflict and Cultural Destruction: Why Totalitarian Regimes Seek to Destroy Historical Memory

Evoking memory of the Nazi onslaught on cultural icons, the Taliban’s destruction of the Bamiyan statues and ISIS's pillaging of pre-Islamic sites has horrified contemporary observers and raised new concerns about the ways certain regimes seek to destroy historical memory. At the same time, new narratives of cultural persistence and survival are emerging, such as Romanian efforts in the Cold War to circumvent censorship through theatre, or contemporary ways to counter hardline censorship of Persian literature in Iran.

Is ISIS Going All Out on Turkey?

The deadly suicide bomb attack that struck Istanbul’s main tourist hub on Tuesday, January 12 is a stark warning to Turkey’s ruling Islamists about the blood-soaked mayhem and financial hardship the country is likely to face should it escalate its conflict against the Islamic State (ISIS). More broadly, it illustrates just how badly Turkey’s policy of backing rebels of all stripes and nationalities to overthrow Syrian President Bashar al-Assad on the one hand, and to stymie Kurdish aspirations on the other, is backfiring.

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