NKIDP Releases New Collection of Documents on Korean War Armistice

Jul 26, 2013

Sixty years ago this week, the 1950-53 Korean War ended in an armistice, with neither side legitimately able to claim outright victory. When the armistice was signed on 27 July 1953, talks had already dragged on for more than two years. Issues such as the line of demarcation were agreed upon early in the negotiations by military commanders from North Korea and China on one side, and the United States on the other. Yet, for over a year-and-a-half, talks became ensnared on the exchange of prisoners of war.

NKIDP has released a collection of Russian, Chinese, and Polish documents on the armistice negotiations which span the nearly two-year period of talks (July 1951-July 1953). The documents shed new light on North Korean, Soviet, and Chinese strategic thinking toward the conflict and the armistice. They also reveal differences between North Korea and China in negotiating strategies and military tactics.

Click here to access this collection and other documents on the Wilson Center’s Digital Archive released from the North Korea International Documentation Project.

Image: UN delegate Lieut. Gen. William K. Harrison, Jr. (seated left), and Korean People’s Army and Chinese People’s Volunteers delegate Gen. Nam Il (seated right) signing the Korean War armistice agreement at P’anmunjŏm, Korea, July 27, 1953. (Dept. of Defense)

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Experts & Staff

  • Christian F. Ostermann // Director, History and Public Policy Program; Global Europe; Cold War International History Project; North Korea Documentation Project; Nuclear Proliferation International History Project
  • James Person // Senior Program Associate
  • Charles Kraus // Program Assistant