Economic Competitiveness

Publications in this category discuss opportunities for strengthening economic ties between the United States and Mexico, innovation and development in key industries, and Mexico’s transformation into a middle class society.

Issues in this Series

Three Keys to Understand the 2015 Budget Debate in Mexico

Christopher Wilson and Pedro Valenzuela
The 2015 budget debate is the first since Mexico's 2013 fiscal reform was implemented, offering an important opportunity to analyze the impact of the tax policy changes on public income, and consequently, on expenditures. Three issues—tax collection, public expenditure, and the national debt—are explored in this article, all in the context of Mexico’s structural reforms and brightening yet somewhat volatile economic prospects.

Is Geography Destiny? A Primer on North American Relations

Christopher Wilson, David Biette, Andrew Finn, Duncan Wood, Kathryn Friedman, and David Shirk
At a time when nearly all of the key issues facing North America are being understood and addressed either independently by the United States, Canada and Mexico, or within the dual-bilateral framework of U.S.-Mexico and U.S.-Canada relations, this report attempts to view these challenges and opportunities through a trilateral lens.

Educational cooperation and exchanges: An emerging issue

Duncan Wood
The Mexico Institute prepared a brief highlighting the potential for expanding student exchange and international mobility programs between the U.S. and Mexico.

Mexico Matters: Change in Mexico and Its Impact Upon the United States

Luis Rubio
The book consists of seven short chapters. The first positions Mexico as a fundamental issue for the United States. The second delves into the origins of the country’s current situation and choices. The third analyzes the conundrum of the nation’s politics. The fourth describes the process of decentralization that overtook the country in recent decades and what that entails for decision making. The fifth explores the economy, where it comes from and how it has performed, as well as its current dilemmas. The sixth examines the issue of security and its complexity. The book ends with a few thoughts on the stakes and opportunities looking toward the future.

A New Agenda with Mexico

Christopher Wilson and Andrew Selee
The depth of economic ties with Mexico, together with declines in illegal immigration and organized crime violence in Mexico, open up an opportunity for U.S. policymakers to deepen the economic relationship with Mexico and to engage Mexico more on major global issues.

Innovation and Development in Mexico: The Promising Road Ahead

Miguel Salazar
Despite the tenuous state of public security in Mexico and the impact the U.S. economic recession has had on the country, Mexico has been successful at boosting its economic performance, while at the same time demonstrating innovation in its agricultural, aerospace, automobile manufacturing and energy sectors.

Mexico: A Middle Class Society, Poor No More, Developed Not Yet

Luis de la Calle and Luis Rubio
In the updated and translated version of their latest book, renowned economic and political analysts Luis de la Calle and Luis Rubio put forth the provocative notion that Mexico has been transformed from a mostly poor to a predominantly middle class country. They document the rise of the middle class and analyze its profound implications.

Working Together: Economic Ties between the United States and Mexico

Christopher Wilson
The report looks at the ways in which regional economic cooperation can enhance competitiveness, stimulate growth and create jobs. There is no doubt that the economies of the United States and Mexico are facing serious challenges. While some of the risk is due to external pressures, whether increasing competition from Asia or fears of crisis in Europe, much of the solution lies in strengthening regional competitiveness. The path forward, then, must be based in a clear understanding that the United States and Mexico are ultimately partners rather than competitors.
Subsidizing Inequality: Mexican Corn Policy Since NAFTA

Subsidizing Inequality: Mexican Corn Policy Since NAFTA

Jonathan Fox and Libby Haight
This study on Mexican corn policy since NAFTA was made possible thanks to a grant from the Global Development Program of the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, and reflects collaboration between the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars’ Mexico Institute, the University of California, Santa Cruz and researchers from CIDE, the Centro de Investigación y Docencia Económicas.

Subsidios para la desigualdad: Las políticas públicas del maíz en México a partir del libre comercio

Jonathan Fox and Libby Haight
Este estudio sobre las políticas públicas del maíz en México a partir del libre comercio ha sido posible gracias a una donativa del Programa de Desarrollo Global (Global Development Program) de la Fundación William y Flora Hewlett y expresa la colaboración entre el Instituto México del Centro Internacional Woodrow Wilson para Académicos, la Universidad de California en Santa Cruz y investigadores del Centro de Investigación y Docencia Económicas (CIDE).

Mexican Rural Development Research Reports

Jonathan Fox
This series of research reports provides additional analysis and information to complement the findings in the report: "Subsidizing Inequality: Mexican Corn Policy Since NAFTA". Esta serie de monografías da un análisis más amplio y detallado para complementar la información en el reporte: "Subsidios para la desigualdad: Las políticas públicas del maíz en México a partir del libre comercio".

La calidad de ciudadano. Past and Present.

The Nature of Citizenship in Mexico and the United States: 1776-1912

Experts & Staff