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Blurring Borders: National, Subnational, and Regional Orders in East Asia

In Japan and China, resurgent nationalism has reinforced the political importance of the region’s most powerful nation-states, fed international tensions in the region, and created additional challenges for U.S. policy.

Date & Time

Monday
Jun. 1, 2015
9:15am – 3:30pm ET

Location

6th Floor, Woodrow Wilson Center
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Overview

This event is co-sponsored by the Foreign Policy Research Institute (FPRI).

In Japan and China, resurgent nationalism has reinforced the political importance of the region’s most powerful nation-states, fed international tensions in the region, and created additional challenges for U.S. policy.

U.S. policy toward the region must grapple with these developments. Key components of Washington’s agenda in security affairs and the pursuit of the Trans-Pacific Partnership in economic affair have the potential to rearrange substantially the patterns of cooperation and conflict in the region. Many discrete issues are implicated, including the reinvigorated alliance with Japan, new security cooperation with Singapore and Vietnam, shifting assessments of Taiwan’s place in U.S.-China relations and the regional order, and the possibility of a growing U.S.-China rivalry focused in part on the multilateral arrangements that both great powers are building. 

For a transcript of Ambassador Roy's keynote address U.S.-China Relations and Regional Order, please click here.

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Hosted By

Asia Program

The Asia Program promotes policy debate and intellectual discussions on U.S. interests in the Asia-Pacific as well as political, economic, security, and social issues relating to the world’s most populous and economically dynamic region.   Read more

Kissinger Institute on China and the United States

The mission of Kissinger Institute on China and the United States is to ensure that informed engagement remains the cornerstone of U.S.-China relations.  Read more

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