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This NPIHP Working Paper features essays written by Hassan Elbahtimy and James G. Hershberg that examine the role of Egypt in the politics and diplomacy of the October 1962 Cuban Missile Crisis. Benefiting from Elbahtimy’s deep expertise in Egyptian nuclear history and Hershberg’s long-standing interest and numerous publications on the Cuban Missile Crisis, the two papers seek to address unanswered questions relating to how Egypt and its government led by President Gamal Abdel Nasser perceived and reacted to the crisis, particularly at the United Nations, in the context of the Cold War and the advent of the Non-Aligned Movement (NAM). The papers draw on a range of primary sources from Egypt, the United States, the United Nations, the Soviet Union, and elsewhere, materials which provide new insights and information on Cairo’s experience of the crisis.

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