6th Floor, Woodrow Wilson Center

Follow-Up to the Investigations of the Disappearance of 43 Students in Iguala, Guerrero, Mexico

Webcast available

Webcast Recap

In September 2014, a group of 43 students from a teachers college disappeared in the southern Mexican city of Iguala in the state of Guerrero. Their disappearance left Mexicans horrified and outraged, shocked the international community, and led to nationwide protests.

Through an agreement with the Mexican government and the families of the disappeared students, the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights appointed a group of international experts to provide technical assistance to the Mexican government in its investigation of this case. In September 2015, the results of the six-month investigation became known to the public. The results have been controversial as some experts agreed with the investigation's findings of major holes in the government's case, while others criticized it for its shortcomings. The Mexican government responded to the report by stating that they would carry out a new investigation and a second opinion from other renowned experts to determine what happened the night the students were presumably killed.

Please join us for an event following up on the investigations of the disappearance and a discussion on the implications for U.S. cooperation with Mexico.

Speakers

Under Secretary Roberto Campa
Under Secretary for Human Rights, Ministry of the Interior

Deputy Attorney General Eber Betanzos
Deputy Attorney General for Human Rights, Office of the Attorney General of the Republic

Under Secretary Miguel Ruiz Cabañas
Under Secretary for Multilateral Affairs and Human Rights, Ministry of Foreign Affairs

Moderator

Duncan Wood
Director, Mexico Institute, Wilson Center