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The 2018 Journalists’ Guide to Energy and Environment

From pipeline politics to hurricane horrors, 2017 witnessed a flood of energy and environment news—and 2018 promises to set a new high-water mark. On January 26 at the Wilson Center, the Society of Environmental Journalists (SEJ) will launch its annual report, "The Journalists' Guide to Energy and Environment,” which previews the top stories of 2018, with comments from a roundtable of leading journalists.

Date & Time

Jan. 26, 2018
3:00pm – 5:00pm

Location

6th Floor, Woodrow Wilson Center
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The 2018 Journalists’ Guide to Energy and Environment

Organized by the Society of Environmental Journalists, George Mason University, and the Wilson Center.

From pipeline politics to hurricane horrors, 2017 witnessed a flood of energy and environment news—and 2018 promises to set a new high-water mark. On January 26 at the Wilson Center, the Society of Environmental Journalists (SEJ) will launch its annual report, "The Journalists' Guide to Energy and Environment,” which previews the top stories of 2018, with comments from a roundtable of leading journalists.

A reception will follow, courtesy of The Nature Conservancy, National Park Foundation, Environment America, The Wilderness Society, and the Environmental Law Institute.

For the last five years, the Society of Environmental Journalists and the Wilson Center have hosted the only annual event in the nation's capital featuring top journalists offering their predictions for the year ahead on environment and energy. Since 2013, more than 30 reporters from New York Times, Washington Post, National Geographic, Politico, Associated Press,  Wall Street Journal and many more have shared their observations with thousands of policymakers, journalists, and business leaders in Washington, DC, and around the world. Always streamed live and always standing room only, this event is essential for anyone working to meet the critical energy and environment challenges facing our nation and the world.

This conversation is part of the ongoing “Managing Our Planet” series, jointly developed by George Mason University and the Wilson Center’s Brazil Institute and Environmental Change and Security Program. The series, now in its sixth year, is premised on the fact that humanity’s impacts are planetary in scale and require planetary-scale solutions.

Want to attend but can’t? Tune into the live or archived webcast on this page. The webcast will be embedded at the start time of the event. If you do not see it when the event begins, please wait a moment and reload the page. Archived webcasts go up approximately one day after the meeting date.

Media guests, including TV crews, are welcome and should RSVP directly to Benjamin.Dills@wilsoncenter.org. Media bringing heavy electronics MUST indicate this in their response so they may be cleared through our building security and allowed entrance. Please err toward responding if you would like to attend.

Join the conversation on Twitter by following @NewSecurityBeat and find related coverage on our blog at NewSecurityBeat.org.


Hosted By

Environmental Change and Security Program

The Environmental Change and Security Program (ECSP) explores the connections between environmental, health, and population dynamics and their links to conflict, human insecurity, and foreign policy.  Read more

Global Risk and Resilience Program

The Global Risk and Resilience Program (GRRP) seeks to support the development of inclusive, resilient networks in local communities facing global change. By providing a platform for sharing lessons, mapping knowledge, and linking people and ideas, GRRP and its affiliated programs empower policymakers, practitioners, and community members to participate in the global dialogue on sustainability and resilience. Empowered communities are better able to develop flexible, diverse, and equitable networks of resilience that can improve their health, preserve their natural resources, and build peace between people in a changing world.  Read more

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