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The second decade of the 21st century increasingly mirrors the world’s political and economic environment of a century before when nationalism, protectionism and isolationism occupied center stage in the global political economy. The key drivers of economic growth and development—neoliberal economic policies and free market-oriented institutional reforms—have fallen out of favor or been rejected to a great extent by a number of governments and large segments of their citizenry the world over. Not surprisingly, the animus towards “globalization” itself has increased with doom-andgloom naysayers (including many formerly proglobalization voices) concluding that globalization is dying, if not dead already.

This essay is part of the series, "Strengthening North American Ties - A Must For Competitiveness," by the Wilson Center's Mexico and Canada Institutes. 

About the Author

Jerry Haar

Jerry Haar

Global Fellow;
Professor and Former Associate Dean and Director, Pino Global Entrepreneurship Center in the College of Business Administration, Florida International University
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Mexico Institute

The Mexico Institute seeks to improve understanding, communication, and cooperation between Mexico and the United States by promoting original research, encouraging public discussion, and proposing policy options for enhancing the bilateral relationship. A binational Advisory Board, chaired by Luis Téllez and Earl Anthony Wayne, oversees the work of the Mexico Institute.   Read more

Canada Institute

Bound by common geopolitical interests and strong economic and cultural ties, Canada and the United States enjoy the world's most successful bilateral relationship. The Wilson Center's Canada Institute is the only public policy forum in the world dedicated to the full spectrum of Canada-U.S. issues. The Canada Institute is a global leader for policymakers, academics and business leaders to engage in non-partisan, informed dialogue about the current and future state of the relationship.     Read more