Skip to main content
Support
Article

Africa: 53 Countries, One Union - The New Challenges

"Africa: 53 Countries, One Union - The New Challenges" is a follow up to last year's Conference in Bologna. This Conference aims to bolster African initiatives toward unity, integration, and prosperity.

Africa: 53 Countries, One Union - The New Challenges

Africa Program, Woodrow Wilson Center; 

School of Advamced International Studies, Johns Hopkins University; 

Foundation for World Wide Cooperation

"Africa: 53 Countries, One Union - The New Challenges" is a follow up to last year's Conference in Bologna. This Conference aims to bolster African initiatives toward unity, integration, and prosperity. Also, at issue will be the role of actors such as the United Nations, African Union, European Union, and the United States and China governments. 

Read "Trade & Economic Development" by Wilson Center Scholars, William Krist and John Sewell by clicking here. Also, read "Peace, Security & Democracy," "A Challenge - The Arab Spring and its Ramification on the Continent" by Ambassador Ahmed Haggag and "Africa's Infrastructure Regional Challenges and Opportunities" by Tanya Konidaris and Clare Allenson here. These discussion papers were presented at Africa: 53 Countries, One Union - The New Challenges, a conference co-sponsored by the Woodrow Wilson Center's Africa Program.

 

Related Programs

Africa Program

The Africa Program works to address the most critical issues facing Africa and U.S.-Africa relations, build mutually beneficial U.S.–Africa relations, and enhance knowledge and understanding about Africa in the United States. The Program achieves its mission through in-depth research and analyses, including our blog Africa Up Close, public discussion, working groups, and briefings that bring together policymakers, practitioners, and subject matter experts to analyze and offer practical options for tackling key challenges in Africa and in U.S.-Africa relations.    Read more

Africa Program

The Africa Program works to address the most critical issues facing Africa and U.S.-Africa relations, build mutually beneficial U.S.–Africa relations, and enhance knowledge and understanding about Africa in the United States. The Program achieves its mission through in-depth research and analyses, including our blog Africa Up Close, public discussion, working groups, and briefings that bring together policymakers, practitioners, and subject matter experts to analyze and offer practical options for tackling key challenges in Africa and in U.S.-Africa relations.    Read more