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Stalin's Police: Public Order and Mass Repression in the USSR, 1926-1941

Stalin's Police: Public Order and Mass Repression in the USSR, 1926-1941 by Paul Hagenloh

Publisher

Woodrow Wilson Center Press with Johns Hopkins University Press, 2009

ISBN

978-0-8018-9182-3
Stalin's Police: Public Order and Mass Repression in the USSR, 1926-1941 by Paul Hagenloh

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Stalin’s Police offers a new interpretation of the mass repressions associated with the Stalinist terror of the late 1930s. This pioneering study traces the development of professional policing from its pre-revolutionary origins through the late 1930s and early 1940s. Paul Hagenloh argues that the policing methods employed in the late 1930s were the culmination of a set of ideologically driven policies dating back to the previous decade. Hagenloh’s vivid and monumental account is the first to show how Stalin’s peculiar brand of policing--in which criminals, juvenile delinquents, and other marginalized population groups were seen increasingly as threats to the political and social order--supplied the core mechanism of the Great Terror.

Paul Hagenloh is an associate professor of history in the Maxwell School at Syracuse University. He was a Title VIII research scholar at the Woodrow Wilson Center in 2004–5.

About the Author

Paul Hagenloh

Title VIII-Supported Research Scholar, Kennan Institute;
Assistant Professor, Department of History, University of Alabama
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