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Putting the Brakes on Carbon: China After Paris

Over the past few years the Chinese government has been accelerating its efforts to cut the country’s CO2 emissions with coal consumption caps, electricity sector reforms, and expanded monitoring, reporting and verification (MRV) systems for carbon—all crucial ingredients to meet the country’s Paris climate commitments by the 2030 target date. At this CEF meeting, speakers will discuss how the Paris Climate Agreement and China’s climate actions may be helping to put the brakes on carbon in China.

Date & Time

Mar. 18, 2016
8:30am – 11:00am

Location

5th Floor, Woodrow Wilson Center
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Putting the Brakes on Carbon: China After Paris

Over the past few years the Chinese government has been accelerating its efforts to cut the country’s CO2 emissions with coal consumption caps, electricity sector reforms, and expanded monitoring, reporting and verification (MRV) systems for carbon—all crucial ingredients to meet the country’s Paris climate commitments by the 2030 target date. 

At this CEF meeting, speakers will discuss how the Paris Climate Agreement and China’s climate actions may be helping to put the brakes on carbon in China. Duncan Marsh (The Nature Conservancy) will examine the structure and nature of the Paris agreement and the role of the United States and China to help move it forward. Michael Davidson (MIT) will draw on his recent fieldwork examining grid operations in north China to discuss some of the obstacles in decarbonizing the country’s power sector. Joanna Lewis (Georgetown University) will discuss some options for China to improve its greenhouse gas MRV system to meet the country’s climate commitments.

Photo Credit: Alternative power in use in Dali, Yunnan Province, China. 2013, courtesy of flickr user Mark Heath.


Hosted By

China Environment Forum

Since 1997, the China Environment Forum's mission has been to forge U.S.-China cooperation on energy, environment, and sustainable development challenges. We play a unique nonpartisan role in creating multi-stakeholder dialogues around these issues.  Read more

Global Risk and Resilience Program

The Global Risk and Resilience Program (GRRP) seeks to support the development of inclusive, resilient networks in local communities facing global change. By providing a platform for sharing lessons, mapping knowledge, and linking people and ideas, GRRP and its affiliated programs empower policymakers, practitioners, and community members to participate in the global dialogue on sustainability and resilience. Empowered communities are better able to develop flexible, diverse, and equitable networks of resilience that can improve their health, preserve their natural resources, and build peace between people in a changing world.  Read more

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