4th Floor, Woodrow Wilson Center

Reforming Brazilian Infrastructure Procurement: Looking at Practical Solutions

The recent Lava Jato investigations have revealed the serious challenge that corruption poses to the efficient delivery of infrastructure and other public services in Brazil and throughout Latin America. As multiple studies have shown, corruption is an obstacle to sustained economic development and democratic institutions alike. 
 
Brazilian prosecutors and courts can continue to prosecute past wrongdoers, but there is a serious need for new procurement policies to prevent such abuses going forward. The Lava Jato investigation is a consequence, in part, of a weak and opaque public procurement process that allowed contractors and government officials to rig public tenders. 
 
It is clear that the process demands greater transparency, fairness, and reliability. It is also clear that actors from all sectors—from civil society watchdogs to the companies at the heart of the corruption scandal—need to work together if we are to make meaningful improvements to the public procurement environment in Brazil.
 
Toward this end, the workshop on September 11th will be the first in a series exploring practical solutions to increase transparency and efficiency in public procurement in Brazil and beyond. 
 
This initial session will focus on a new project, proposed by a group of business and civil society leaders in Brazil. Speakers will include Ricardo Young (Instituto Ethos), Caio Rodriguez (Barros Pimentel Advogados), Felipe Moreno (JusBrasil), Ricardo Simoes (Odebrecht), and Joel Velasco (Albright Stonebridge Group). They will outline their proposal for an independent, non-profit entity dedicated to improving the transparency, efficiency, and competitiveness of the infrastructure sector. A core element of the project is the establishment of an independent yet verifiable monitoring system for public tenders through state-of-the-art data analysis technologies.
 
Please join us in the morning of September 11th at 10:00am at the Wilson Center (4th Floor Conference Room) to discuss new ideas to combat one of the most serious problems facing Brazil and much of the developing world.