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Report Release: Geoengineering for Decision Makers

As concerns about climate change grow and the possibility that we may have to resort to geoengineering to avert a climate catastrophe begins to be taken more seriously, several different viewpoints are emerging about how geoengineering should or could be developed and used.

Date & Time

Thursday
Nov. 10, 2011
12:00pm – 2:30pm ET

Location

5th Floor, Woodrow Wilson Center
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Report Release: Geoengineering for Decision Makers

Proposals for using geoengineering to counteract global warming have been viewed with extreme skepticism, but as projections concerning the impact of climate change have become direr, a growing number of scientists have begun to argue that geoengineering deserves a second look.

There is an overwhelming consensus in the scientific community that human activities are significant contributors to global temperature changes, even if other dynamics are also at work. Though there are still uncertainties about how fast the climate will change, there is substantial agreement that the impacts could become dangerous over the decades ahead. The greatest danger is that we could pass “tipping points” of self-amplifying, irreversible change into a much hotter world.

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