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Swiss Day: Can Central Banks Save the Global Economy?

The global economic crisis highlighted the importance of central banks in preventing economic collapse and restoring growth while maintaining financial stability. Central banks have responded with innovative policies to address these challenges. At the same time, fiscal authorities in many countries are tightly constrained.

Date & Time

Nov. 19, 2015
3:00pm – 5:00pm

Location

6th Floor, Woodrow Wilson Center
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Swiss Day: Can Central Banks Save the Global Economy?

The 2nd Annual Swiss Day marks the ongoing collaboration of the Wilson Center’s Global Europe Program and the Europa Institut at the University of Zurich.

The global economic crisis highlighted the importance of central banks in preventing economic collapse and restoring growth while maintaining financial stability. Central banks have responded with innovative policies to address these challenges. At the same time, fiscal authorities in many countries are tightly constrained. Thus either explicitly or implicitly, many governments are ceding macroeconomic policy authority to their central banks. Is this sustainable in the long run? With large cross border capital flows adding complexity, should central bankers actively coordinate their policies? Is this possible without compromising national objectives and central bank independence? Please join us as our expert panel provides U.S. and European perspectives on these and other critical issues.

This event is co-sponsored by the Europa Institut at the University of Zurich.


Hosted By

Global Europe Program

The Global Europe Program addresses vital issues affecting Europe’s relations with the rest of the world through scholars-in-residence, seminars, international conferences and publications. These programmatic activities cover wide-ranging topics include: European energy security, the role of the European Union and NATO, democratic transitions, and counter-terrorism, among others. The program also investigates comparatively European approaches to policy issues of importance to the United States, including migration, global governance, and relations with Russia, China and the Middle East.  Read more

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