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The Fighting Group against Inhumanity: The Incarnation of Anticommunism in a Divided Germany 1948-1959

The “Fighting Group Against Inhumanity” (“Kampfgruppe gegen Unmenschlichkeit” / KgU) has for a long time been considered the incarnation of both anticommunism and hostility to the German Democratic Republic in both East and West. Author Enrico Heitzer examines the emergence, the organizational structure and the fields of action of this privately run, but politically highly effective organization.

Date & Time

Oct. 21, 2015
3:00pm – 4:30pm

Location

4th Floor, Woodrow Wilson Center
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The Fighting Group against Inhumanity: The Incarnation of Anticommunism in a Divided Germany 1948-1959

Image removed.Image removed.The “Fighting Group Against Inhumanity” (“Kampfgruppe gegen Unmenschlichkeit” / KgU) has for a long time been considered the incarnation of both anticommunism and hostility to the German Democratic Republic in both East and West. Founded in 1948 in response to the wave of releases of prisoners from the Soviet “special camps” and resolved during the second Berlin crisis in 1959, the KgU not only undertook humanitarian activities, disseminated leaflets, and took action as intelligence service – it also promoted and temporarily practiced itself violence as a means of resistance against the communist government in Eastern Germany. This study examines the emergence, the organizational structure and the fields of action of this privately run, but politically highly effective organization.

“The book is a scientific work, an analysis, objective and without emotional outbursts or ethical judgments. It is this that makes it so valuable; because its reading is as exciting as a thriller.”
- Egon Bahr

Enrico Heitzer – Ph.D., Research Assistant, Sachsenhausen Memorial and Museum, Brandenburg Memorials Foundation, Oranienburg, Germany.

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Cold War International History Project

The Cold War International History Project supports the full and prompt release of historical materials by governments on all sides of the Cold War. Through an award winning Digital Archive, the Project allows scholars, journalists, students, and the interested public to reassess the Cold War and its many contemporary legacies. It is part of the Wilson Center's History and Public Policy Program.  Read more

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