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The Limits of Detente: The United States, the Soviet Union, and the Arab-Israeli Conflict, 1969-1973

In "The Limits of Detente," Craig Daigle draws on newly released documents to shed new light on how the 1973 Arab-Israeli War was the result of not only tension and competing interest between Arabs and Israelis, but also policies adopted in both Washington and Moscow. Between 1969 and 1973, the Middle East in general and the Arab-Israeli conflict in particular emerged as a crucial Cold War battleground where the limits of detente appeared in sharp relief.

Date & Time

Thursday
Nov. 8, 2012
3:30pm – 5:00pm ET

Location

5th Floor, Woodrow Wilson Center
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Overview

In The Limits of Detente: The United States, the Soviet Union, and the Arab-Israeli Conflict, 1969-1973, an analysis of the origins of the October 1973 Arab-Israeli War, Craig Daigle, assistant professor at the City College of New York draws on newly released documents to shed new light on how the war resulted not only from tension and competing interest between Arabs and Israelis, but also from policies adopted in both Washington and Moscow. Between 1969 and 1973, the Middle East in general and the Arab-Israeli conflict in particular emerged as a crucial Cold War battleground where the limits of detente appeared in sharp relief.

By prioritizing Cold War detente,Daigle shows how the United States and the Soviet Union fueled regional instability that ultimately undermined the prospects of a lasting peace agreement in the Middle East. Daigle further argues that as detente increased tensions between Arabs and Israelis, these tensions in turn negatively affected U.S.-Soviet relations.

Tim McDonnell, program associate with the Wilson Center's Nuclear Proliferation International History Project will chair the event.

To purchase the book visit the Yale University Press website.

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Cold War International History Project

The Cold War International History Project supports the full and prompt release of historical materials by governments on all sides of the Cold War. Through an award winning Digital Archive, the Project allows scholars, journalists, students, and the interested public to reassess the Cold War and its many contemporary legacies. It is part of the Wilson Center's History and Public Policy Program.  Read more

History and Public Policy Program

The History and Public Policy Program strives to make public the primary source record of 20th and 21st century international history from repositories around the world, to facilitate scholarship based on those records, and to use these materials to provide context for classroom, public, and policy debates on global affairs.  Read more

Middle East Program

The Wilson Center’s Middle East Program serves as a crucial resource for the policymaking community and beyond, providing analyses and research that helps inform U.S. foreign policymaking, stimulates public debate, and expands knowledge about issues in the wider Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region.  Read more

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