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“This is not a country that is racked by insecurity, but these bombs that have gone off in fairly rapid succession have created a sense of concern about what’s going on and opened up a debate about what the government is doing in the security arena,” said Cynthia Arnson, director of the Wilson Center’s Latin America program. “The main pressure is on the government to investigate and prosecute the people responsible for these incidents. If it fails to do that, and the explosions continue, the government is going to be faced with a very distinct problem.”

Arnson also said the national security question could take over the domestic reform agenda of President Bachelet, who stepped into her second presidential term this year.  

“The Bachelet administration defined itself on issues other than security -- tax reform, education reform, and the possibility of a constitutional reform. This completely shifts the debate away from the issues that she wanted to focus on and devote her energies to,” Arnson said.

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