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Indigenous Midwives

Please join the Wilson Center’s Maternal Health Initiative, in partnership with UNFPA and the International Confederation of Midwives, for a discussion with an eminent panel of Indigenous midwives on the varying impacts of past and present maternal health service policies and health systems on Indigenous mothers and families; examples of successful policy changes and existing barriers towards improving Indigenous maternity care; and country-specific strategies used to enhance Indigenous midwifery care and the Indigenous midwifery workforce.

Date & Time

Sep. 22, 2020
3:30pm – 5:00pm
This event will be webcast live

Indigenous Midwives

The live event webcast will appear on this webpage promptly at 3:30 pm EDT. If it does not immediately appear on the webpage, please refresh your screen at 3:30 pm.

Across the world, Indigenous women and adolescent girls experience significantly worse maternal health outcomes and mortality than non-Indigenous populations. They also experience extensive barriers to accessing health care resulting from discrimination and a broad range of social, economic, political, cultural, and geographical factors. Maternity services and health policies in many countries are designed to offer women and their newborns the best care, but they predominantly reflect contemporary western medical values rather than Indigenous worldviews. Culturally appropriate models of care and care providers can contribute to addressing the vast health disparities between Indigenous and non-Indigenous populations. Indigenous midwives play a critical role in building healthy and safe Indigenous communities across the globe.

Please join the Wilson Center’s Maternal Health Initiative, in partnership with UNFPA and the International Confederation of Midwives, for a discussion with an eminent panel of Indigenous midwives on the varying impacts of past and present maternal health service policies and health systems on Indigenous mothers and families; examples of successful policy changes and existing barriers towards improving Indigenous maternity care; and country-specific strategies used to enhance Indigenous midwifery care and the Indigenous midwifery workforce.

Send questions for our panelists during the event to mhi@wilsoncenter.orgFollow the conversation on Twitter @Wilson_MHIFind more coverage of these issues on our blog, NewSecurityBeat.com/dot-mom.


Hosted By

Maternal Health Initiative

Life and health are the most basic human rights, yet disparities between and within countries continue to grow. No single solution or institution can address the variety of health concerns the world faces. By leveraging, building on, and coordinating the Wilson Center’s strong regional and cross-cutting programming, the Maternal Health Initiative (MHI) promotes dialogue and understanding among practitioners, scholars, community leaders, and policymakers.  Read more