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A Poisonous Thorn in Our Hearts: Sudan and South Sudan's Bitter and Incomplete Divorce

Benefiting from unsurpassed access to the politicians, rebels, thinkers and events that are shaping the Sudans, author James Copnall draws a compelling portrait of two misunderstood countries. He will discuss his new book "A Poisonous Thorn in Our Hearts" where he argues that Sudan and South Sudan remain deeply interdependent, despite their separation.

Date & Time

May. 20, 2014
1:00pm – 2:30pm

Location

6th Floor, Woodrow Wilson Center
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A Poisonous Thorn in Our Hearts: Sudan and South Sudan's Bitter and Incomplete Divorce

The Woodrow Wilson Center’s Africa Program is pleased to invite you to a book launch and discussion with James Copnall, author of A Poisonous Thorn in Our Hearts: Sudan and South Sudan's Bitter and Incomplete Divorce.

When South Sudan became independent in July 2011, two new nations were born, South Sudan and Sudan. In the years after separation, the two Sudans dealt with crippling economic challenges, struggled with new and old rebellions, and fought each other along their disputed border.

Benefiting from unsurpassed access to the politicians, rebels, thinkers and events that are shaping the Sudans, James Copnall draws a compelling portrait of two misunderstood countries. A Poisonous Thorn in Our Hearts argues that Sudan and South Sudan remain deeply interdependent, despite their separation.

The book discussion with James Copnall will also feature Amal Hassan Fadlalla, Wilson Center Fellow; and Alan J. Kuperman, Jennings Randolph Senior Fellow at the U.S. Institute of Peace. Alan Goulty, Wilson Center Global Fellow, will introduce the panel and moderate the discussion.


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Africa Program

The Africa Program works to address the most critical issues facing Africa and U.S.-Africa relations, build mutually beneficial U.S.–Africa relations, and enhance knowledge and understanding about Africa in the United States. The Program achieves its mission through in-depth research and analyses, including our blog Africa Up Close, public discussion, working groups, and briefings that bring together policymakers, practitioners, and subject matter experts to analyze and offer practical options for tackling key challenges in Africa and in U.S.-Africa relations.    Read more

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