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The United States, the Soviet Union, and the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty, 1966-1968

The Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) was, to quote President Johnson’s national security adviser, Walt Rostow, “a constitutional arrangement for the organization of the noncommunist world.” While its negotiations reopened lines of communication between the superpowers that had been closed since Nuremberg, Moscow mostly played a supporting role. Its cooperation, though necessary, was insufficient for the treaty’s success. The NPT depended as well on an unlikely marriage between America’s Cold War alliances in Western Europe and East Asia and collective security arrangements under the UN in those regions having recently undergone decolonization. Dr. Hunt discussed the nuances of the NPT’s negotiation and its significance for contemporary crises.

Date & Time

Sep. 13, 2017
9:00am – 10:00am

Location

6th Floor, Woodrow Wilson Center
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The United States, the Soviet Union, and the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty, 1966-1968

The Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) was, to quote President Johnson’s national security adviser, Walt Rostow, “a constitutional arrangement for the organization of the noncommunist world.” While its negotiations reopened lines of communication between the superpowers that had been closed since Nuremberg, Moscow mostly played a supporting role. Its cooperation, though necessary, was insufficient for the treaty’s success. The NPT depended as well on an unlikely marriage between America’s Cold War alliances in Western Europe and East Asia and collective security arrangements under the UN in those regions having recently undergone decolonization. Dr. Hunt discussed the nuances of the NPT’s negotiation and its significance for contemporary crises. 

Speaker

Jonathan Hunt

Jonathan Hunt

Title VIII Research Scholar,
Lecturer, University of Southampton; Visiting Scholar, Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies, Harvard University
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Hosted By

Kennan Institute

The Kennan Institute is the premier U.S. center for advanced research on Russia and Eurasia and the oldest and largest regional program at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars. The Kennan Institute is committed to improving American expertise and knowledge of Russia, Ukraine, and the region. Through its residential fellowship programs, public lectures, workshops, and publications, the Institute strives to attract, publicize, and integrate new research into the policy community.  Read more

History and Public Policy Program

The History and Public Policy Program uses history to improve understanding of important global dynamics, trends in international relations, and American foreign policy.  Read more

Nuclear Proliferation International History Project

The Nuclear Proliferation International History Project is a global network of individuals and institutions engaged in the study of international nuclear history through archival documents, oral history interviews, and other empirical sources. At the Wilson Center, it is part of the Wilson Center's History and Public Policy Program.  Read more

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