Environmental Security

America Must Act on the North and South Poles

The two poles of our planet — the Arctic and Antarctica — demand greater attention right now. For decades, the United States has played a leadership role in both regions, a responsibility that it must continue to fulfill as a warming climate and other drivers of change are creating new challenges and opportunities. Regrettably, the Trump administration has not devoted the resources or high-level attention necessary to maintaining American leadership position on these critical matters.

National Guard Interests in the Arctic: Arctic and Extreme Cold Weather Capability

Senior leaders representing the National Guard Arctic Interest Council will discuss how the National Guard is contributing to the advancement of Arctic and cold weather capabilities within U.S. defense institutions. The National Guard Arctic Interest Council is a forum of subject matter experts from eighteen States with interests in cold weather and Arctic operations.

Shaping Alaska’s Climate Policy: A Conversation with Lt. Governor Byron Mallott

Alaska is warming at twice the rate as the rest of the U.S. and is already experiencing adverse impacts from climate change. Across the state, Alaskans are observing unprecedented environmental changes that threaten their health, safety, culture, and economic security.

Maritime Security in the Polar Regions: Legal Perspectives from the United States and China

Large-scale environmental changes have precipitated changing geopolitical and maritime conditions at both poles. These changes are expanding shipping and resource development activities in the Arctic.  Similar changes are also affecting Antarctica and may complicate governance of scientific research, tourism and fisheries management in that region. Both China, which released in January 2018 its first formal Arctic policy, and the United States have interests in the responsible development of the Arctic region and are key players in Antarctica as well.

Big Data for Resilience (BD4R) Storybook Launch Event

Could a ‘resilience lens’ help us to better understand and use Big Data in international development?

 

Experiences around the world suggest that Big Data is enabling larger, creative, and often socially-driven changes involving highly diverse stakeholders. But there is still a lot to learn about the links that exist between Big Data, resilience, and the achievement of long-term development goals, and about their implications for practitioners, policy makers and researchers.

China’s Rapid Rise as a Green Finance Champion

The Year of the Dog marks China’s fourth year in its “war on pollution” and the central government continues to ramp up laws and regulations to reverse damage to the country’s air, water, and soil. To build Xi Jinping’s ecological civilization, China will need to invest nearly 3-4 trillion RMB each year to improve pollution enforcement and expand pollution control, clean energy, and energy efficiency industries.

Tackling Microplastics on Our Own

Background

Plastics, ranging from the circles of soda can rings to microbeads the size of pinheads, are starting to replace images of sewage for a leading cause of pollution – especially in the ocean [1]. The threats of plastics are pervasive, with current estimates placing over 250,000 tons of plastic floating around the world’s oceans [3].  

Why and How the United States Can Help Ukraine Strengthen Its Chemical Security

Almost from the onset of the conflict in eastern Ukraine in 2014, many organizations have called for action to reduce the risk of shelling of industrial sites containing chemicals. Protecting chemical facilities across Ukraine is a no less important task. This can be explained by many reasons.

Protecting Polar Ocean Spaces

Two landmark events occurred in the closing months of 2017 that demonstrate the ability of nations to protect the Polar Regions. In December, nine nations and the European Union successfully concluded negotiations on an agreement to prevent unregulated fishing in the high seas portion of the Central Arctic Ocean (CAO). In the same month, 24 nations and the European Union welcomed the entry into force of the Ross Sea Marine Protected Area (MPA) in Antarctica.

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