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Tracking a Changing Climate: Citizen Science Contributions to the National Climate Assessment

Join us for a public forum exploring ways in which crowd-based approaches, such as citizen science and community-based monitoring, are and can be used to track climate change and support indicators or indicator systems.

Date & Time

Nov. 18, 2014
2:00pm – 4:30pm

Location

6th Floor, Woodrow Wilson Center
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Tracking a Changing Climate: Citizen Science Contributions to the National Climate Assessment

 

Tracking a Changing Climate: Citizen Science Contributions to the National Climate Assessment

The vision for the U.S. National Climate Assessment (NCA) includes creating a set of of indicators - measures of key physical, ecological, and societal variables and values - that would inform and support decision-making about climate changes, impacts, vulnerabilities, and responses.  This roundtable will explore ways in which crowd-based approaches, such as citizen science and community-based monitoring, are and can be used to support indicators or indicator systems of climate change, impacts and response. 

Keynotes:

Dr. Virginia Burkett, Acting Associate Director, Climate and Land Use Change, US Geological Survey

Dr. Richard Spinrad, Chief Scientist, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

Tuesday, November 18th from 2:00 PM – 4:30 PM
To attend in person, please RSVP here.

This event will be live streamed during the keynote and panel discussion; registration is not required for online participation. 

Follow the event on Twitter@STIPCommonsLab and use the #indicatorsCitSci to ask questions.

The Wilson Center
Ronald Reagan Building and International Trade Center
One Woodrow Wilson Plaza
1300 Pennsylvania Ave. NW
Washington, DC
Directions: http://www.wilsoncenter.org/directions

This event is free and open to the public. Please allow time on arrival at the building for routine security procedures. A photo ID is required.

Individuals attending Woodrow Wilson Center events may be audiotaped, videotaped, or photographed during the course of a meeting, and by attending grant permission for their likenesses and the content of their comments, if any, to be broadcast, webcast, published, or otherwise reported or recorded.

This work is supported by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation.


Hosted By

Science and Technology Innovation Program

The Science and Technology Innovation Program (STIP) brings foresight to the frontier. Our experts explore emerging technologies through vital conversations, making science policy accessible to everyone.  Read more

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