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Brexit and the Long, Slow EU-UK Divorce

Michael J. Geary

In his opinion piece “Brexit and the Long, Slow EU-UK Divorce,” Global Europe Global Fellow Michael Geary and co-author Kevin Lees address growing Euroscepticism across Britain ahead of the June 23 referendum on European Union membership. “Unhappy couples,” they argue, “simply do not stay together.”

Brexit and the Long, Slow EU-UK Divorce

In his opinion piece “Brexit and the Long, Slow EU-UK Divorce,” Global Europe Global Fellow Michael Geary and co-author Kevin Lees address growing Euroscepticism across Britain ahead of the June 23 referendum on European Union membership. “Unhappy couples,” they argue, “simply do not stay together.” The authors trace the history of disagreement between the UK and the EU as evidence that the two have been building towards separation for decades. The British have long been deemed reluctant EU members – they are not part of the Eurozone or the Schengen area. Should it choose to leave, however, the UK will still have to accept EU rules and regulations to maintain access to the single market and other EU benefits, without having a hand in setting them.

This piece appeared in the National Interest. Read the full piece here.

About the Author

Michael J. Geary

Michael J. Geary

Global Fellow;
Associate Professor, Modern Europe and the European Union, Faculty of Humanities, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway
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Global Europe Program

The Global Europe Program addresses vital issues affecting the European continent, U.S.-European relations, and Europe’s ties with the rest of the world. It does this through scholars-in-residence, seminars, policy study groups, media commentary, international conferences and publications. Activities cover a wide range of topics, from the role of NATO, the European Union and the OSCE to European energy security, trade disputes, challenges to democracy, and counter-terrorism. The program investigates European approaches to policy issues of importance to the United States, including globalization, digital transformation, climate, migration, global governance, and relations with Russia and Eurasia, China and the Indo-Pacific, the Middle East and Africa.  Read more