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Canada and the Korean War: A Forgotten Ally in a Forgotten War

With nearly 30,000 boots on the ground in Korea, Canada fought in several key battles and engagements, provided naval and aerial support to the UN, and suffered hundreds of combat causalities. Although often overlooked or forgotten, the Korean War is a key chapter in the US-Canada relationship, in Canada’s modern military history, and in the record of Canada’s engagement with multilateral and collective security institutions.

Date & Time

Thursday
Apr. 22, 2021
3:30pm – 5:00pm ET

Location

Zoom Webinar

Overview

Canadian armed forces fought in the Korean War alongside soldiers from the United States and other United Nations member states, helping to protect the Republic of Korea (South Korea) from repeated North Korean and Chinese encroachments south of the 38th Parallel.

With nearly 30,000 boots on the ground in Korea, Canada fought in several key battles and engagements, provided naval and aerial support to the UN, and suffered hundreds of combat causalities. Although often overlooked or forgotten, the Korean War is a key chapter in the US-Canada relationship, in Canada’s modern military history, and in the record of Canada’s engagement with multilateral and collective security institutions.

On the seventieth anniversary of one of the most notable episodes of Canadian involvement in the Korean War, the Battle of Kapyong, the Wilson Center’s Canada Institute and History and Public Policy Program are bringing together three leading specialists in Canada’s diplomatic and military history to examine the Canadian experience of this devastating conflict. What domestic and international forces drove Canada to participate in the UN intervention in Korea? How did the war shape or reshape the US-Canada relationship? What did Canada’s participation in the war look like? How did Canadian soldiers experience the conflict? What lingering issues did Canadian veterans face after the cessation of hostilities in 1953? And finally, how is the Korean War remembered in Canada today?


Hosted By

History and Public Policy Program

The History and Public Policy Program strives to make public the primary source record of 20th and 21st century international history from repositories around the world, to facilitate scholarship based on those records, and to use these materials to provide context for classroom, public, and policy debates on global affairs.  Read more

Canada Institute

Bound by common geopolitical interests and strong economic and cultural ties, Canada and the United States enjoy the world's most successful bilateral relationship. The Wilson Center's Canada Institute is the only public policy forum in the world dedicated to the full spectrum of Canada-U.S. issues. The Canada Institute is a global leader for policymakers, academics and business leaders to engage in non-partisan, informed dialogue about the current and future state of the relationship.     Read more

Asia Program

The Asia Program promotes policy debate and intellectual discussions on U.S. interests in the Asia-Pacific as well as political, economic, security, and social issues relating to the world’s most populous and economically dynamic region.   Read more

Cold War International History Project

The Cold War International History Project supports the full and prompt release of historical materials by governments on all sides of the Cold War. Through an award winning Digital Archive, the Project allows scholars, journalists, students, and the interested public to reassess the Cold War and its many contemporary legacies. It is part of the Wilson Center's History and Public Policy Program.  Read more

North Korea International Documentation Project

The North Korea International Documentation Project serves as an informational clearinghouse on North Korea for the scholarly and policymaking communities, disseminating documents on the DPRK from its former communist allies that provide valuable insight into the actions and nature of the North Korean state. It is part of the Wilson Center's History and Public Policy Program.  Read more

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