Skip to main content
Support

Public Health in Mexico

Mexico is facing a wide array of new public health challenges, particularly as it confronts numerous challenges related to COVID-19. While policymakers and public health officials continue to deal with the problems of infectious diseases and undernutrition, they are experiencing a rapid growth in disease risk factors such as obesity, particularly in urban settings. Although committing to a universal health care system, the necessary resources have not yet been made available, and a wholesale reform of the system remains pending.

COVID-19

Podcast: Evaluating the Impact of COVID-19 in Mexico

In this briefing, experts on the ground discuss the outbreak in Mexico and the country's public health system, the possible impact on Mexico's economy, and public sentiment in Mexico surrounding the government's response to COVID-19.

Listen to the Briefing
Image - El gran confinamiento/the great lockdown

Podcast: The "Great Exacerbator" Hits Mexico's Most Vulnerable

COVID-19 has disproportionately impacted vulnerable communities in Mexico, including women and children. In this episode, host Olivia Soledad speaks with Dr. Silvia Núñez, Professor at the National Autonomous University in Mexico (UNAM), about the exacerbated challenges women are facing during the pandemic, including the challenges they face to access health and safety services.

Listen to the episode
Cover Page

Crossborder Collaboration on Public Health: The 2009 U.S.-Mexico Response to H1N1

Quality of life in the U.S.-Mexico border communities is built not only upon commerce, tourism, and a host of comparative advantages, but also on a network of diplomatic and epidemiological collaborative efforts to safeguard health at community, regional, and national scales. In this paper, we turn our attention to infectious diseases by focusing on the bilateral response to the 2009 H1N1 pandemic.

Read the publication

Mexico Public Health Initiative

  • Mexico is facing a wide array of new public health challenges, particularly as it confronts numerous challenges related to COVID-19. While policymakers and public health officials continue to deal with the problems of infectious diseases and undernutrition, they are experiencing a rapid growth in disease risk factors such as obesity, particularly in urban settings. Although committing to a universal health care system, the necessary resources have not yet been made available, and a wholesale reform of the system remains pending.

  • The Mexico Public Health Initiative 2020 vision is the creation of a modern and progressive Mexican health care system that includes perspectives from diverse actors and segment of society.

  • During its 3-year existence, the Mexico Public Health Initiative has worked to create open spaces for dynamic and productive dialogue on issues of fundamental importance to the future of Mexican health systems. The Mexico Institute is building a dialogue on Mexican public health policy and U.S.-Mexico health policy, including (but not limited to) the following priority issue areas: health sector regulation, government procurement, innovation and technology in public health delivery; government spending and healthcare financing; database management; non-communicable diseases; and PPPs in health, to name a few.

  • Through the Mexico Public Health Initiative 2020, the Mexico Institute will organize an ongoing series of events, publications, and conversations on a range of issues concerning the modernization of health care in Mexico. Programming will include events in Mexico City, bringing together decision makers from Mexico’s public health sector with experts from both the private sector and academia. The purpose of these dialogues will be to discuss international best practices, new ideas, and existing challenges of Mexico’s system.

    The principal themes of this year’s programming will be the twin issues of government procurement practices in the health sector and reform of the main public health regulatory body, COFEPRIS.  In addition, it is hoped that we will have the opportunity to engage with Mexican health decision-makers in Washington, DC.