NAFTA/USMCA | Wilson Center

NAFTA/USMCA

Dr. Luis Rubio: Policy and Progress in Mexico

A former Public Policy Scholar with the Wilson Center's Latin American Program, Dr. Luis Rubio is an expert on issues of democracy, economics and globalization, global governance and political economy. He is currently serving as a Global Fellow with the Wilson Center's Mexico Institute and chairman of the Center of Research for Development (CIDAC), an independent research institution devoted to the study of economic and political policy issues.

Reaching Agreement with Mexico

U.S. and Mexican cabinet ministers are conducting intense negotiations this week to craft solutions on handling Central American migrant flows.  They seek to forgo a dangerous path of ratcheting up U.S. tariffs on Mexican imports that would dearly cost U.S. consumers, businesses and farmers.  

As former U.S. Ambassadors to Mexico, we urge these senior leaders to delink trade and immigration and find ways ahead to address the real problems around Central American migration.  Otherwise, we face lose-lose outcomes. 

Time to Seal the Deal on USMCA

The time is ripe for the Trump administration and the Democratic majority in the House of Representatives to forge an agreement for approval of the new North American trade agreement, called the U.S.-Mexico-Canada Agreement, or the USMCA.

The new NAFTA will give North America at least 16 years of modern, predictable rules and processes for strengthening the continent’s massive trade and co-production networks, including the many millions of jobs they support.

Sixth Annual Building a Competitive U.S.-Mexico Border Conference

The Wilson Center's Mexico Institute and the Border Trade Alliance held the sixth annual high-level "Building a Competitive U.S.-Mexico Border" conference, which focused on improving border management in order to strengthen the competitiveness of both the United States and Mexico. Topics covered at the conference included USMCA (the renegotiated NAFTA), strengthening security and efficiency at border ports of entry, the impact of tariffs and reduced staffing on trade, and growing crossborder cooperation for regional economic development.

Infographic: Mexico's New Labor Reform

Knowledge Gaps Create Opportunity for Mischief Among U.S. Legislators as USMCA Ratification Stalls

Originally published in

Trump Threatens to Put Tariffs on Cars Coming from Mexico

"Imposing tariffs on cars for this reason would be a huge violation of existing trade rules. What’s more it would be immensely costly for US auto producers and consumers. It’s difficult to see this as a credible threat. The Mexican government will surely view this threat with some skepticism as well as frustration after making significant concessions to Trump on migration last week."

- Duncan Wood 

 

Get USMCA Done to Preserve Over 30 Years of Prosperity

The United States, Mexico and Canada have forged a massive commercial relationship over the past three decades.

The North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) significantly reorientated all three economies. Businesses and farmers built mutually beneficial co-production networks that enabled them to compete successfully against other global trading powers.

The new U.S.-Mexico-Canada trade agreement (USMCA) preserves economic advances wrought since NAFTA came into effect in 1994.

The USMCA and the Future of Mexico's Trade Policy under AMLO

In this event, Luz María de la Mora, Mexico's Undersecretary for Foreign Trade, discussed the USMCA and future directions of Mexico's trade policy under AMLO.

Pages